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McConnell vows to 'vigorously' oppose Moore's Senate bid

 
"We'll be opposing Roy Moore vigorously," McConnell told reporters after returning to the Capitol after a White House briefing on Iran.
 
McConnell's comments come after he warned, during an interview with the Associated Press shortly before Moore announced his bid, that he would "oppose him in every way."
 
Moore announced on Thursday afternoon that he would launch a bid for Alabama's Senate seat after previously winning the party's nomination in 2017, only to lose to now-Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.) in a contentious special election.
 
His candidacy is a national nightmare for Republicans. They blame him for losing what they view as a safe GOP seat in a deeply red state that President TrumpDonald John TrumpObama slams Trump in Miami: 'Florida Man wouldn't even do this stuff' Trump makes his case in North Carolina, Ohio and Wisconsin Pence's chief of staff tests positive for COVID-19 MORE won easily in 2016.
 
Moore lost the race after facing multiple accusations of pursuing sexual and romantic relationships with teenage girls decades ago when he was in his 30s; he has denied any wrongdoing.
 
National outside groups allied with McConnell had previously indicated they were leaving the door open to working to make sure Moore doesn't win the party's nomination for a second time. McConnell's comments mark the clearest indication that national Republicans intend to try to stop any potential momentum for Moore.
 
Jack Pandol, a spokesman for the McConnell-aligned Senate Leadership Fund, said Moore winning the GOP nomination "would be gift wrapping" the Senate seat for Democrats.
 
"We believe most Alabama Republicans realize that nominating Roy Moore would be gift wrapping this Senate seat for Chuck SchumerChuck SchumerTrump expressed doubt to donors GOP can hold Senate: report Trump announces opening of relations between Sudan and Israel Five takeaways on Iran, Russia election interference MORE. It remains to be seen whether Moore can escape his baggage without his candidacy collapsing under its own weight," he added in a statement.
 
 
"I don't think it would help the president. I don't think it would help anybody running. He would … take a lot of oxygen out of there," Shelby said.
 
Asked if he thought GOP groups should actively campaign against Moore, he added: "I think a lot of them will."
 
Moore ran against the national GOP establishment during his 2017 Senate bid, and argued on Thursday that they will try to "smear" him.
 
“Why is there such a fear, such an anger to somebody running?” Moore said. “The mere mention of my name causes people to get up and arms in D.C.”
 
Rebecca Kheel contributed.
 
Updated at 6:04 p.m.