No 2020 candidates websites are fully accessible to the blind: review

No 2020 candidates websites are fully accessible to the blind: review
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None of the top candidates currently running for president have websites that are fully accessible for a blind person to navigate, according to a review by a Miami-based institute for the blind

The Miami Lighthouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired conducted a review of campaign websites for the 20 Democratic candidates participating in the debates, as well as President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden says voters should choose who nominates Supreme Court justice Trump, Biden will not shake hands at first debate due to COVID-19 Pelosi: Trump Supreme Court pick 'threatens' Affordable Care Act MORE and his only GOP primary challenger, former Massachusetts governor William Feld.

“It makes a person furious. It makes me wonder why candidates talk about their concern for people with disabilities and yet out of ignorance, they have the sin of omission, of not considering this," Miami Lighthouse CEO Virginia Jacko, a blind voter, told Time.

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The review graded accessibility for the blind on a score of 1 to 4, ranging from "not accessible" to "fully accessible."

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The top four candidates in terms of accessibility were former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden says voters should choose who nominates Supreme Court justice Trump, Biden will not shake hands at first debate due to COVID-19 Joe Biden should enact critical government reforms if he wins MORE, former Rep. John DelaneyJohn DelaneyCoronavirus Report: The Hill's Steve Clemons interviews Rep. Rodney Davis Eurasia Group founder Ian Bremmer says Trump right on China but wrong on WHO; CDC issues new guidance for large gatherings The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas says country needs to rethink what 'policing' means; US cases surpass 2 million with no end to pandemic in sight MORE (D-Md.), Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardRepublicans call on DOJ to investigate Netflix over 'Cuties' film Hispanic Caucus campaign arm endorses slate of non-Hispanic candidates Gabbard says she 'was not invited to participate in any way' in Democratic convention MORE (D-Hawaii) and Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandSunday shows preview: Lawmakers prepare for SCOTUS confirmation hearings before election Sunday shows preview: Justice Ginsburg dies, sparking partisan battle over vacancy before election Suburban moms are going to decide the 2020 election MORE (D-N.Y.), who each received a 3 for "mostly accessible."

The review found Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOvernight Defense: Appeals court revives House lawsuit against military funding for border wall | Dems push for limits on transferring military gear to police | Lawmakers ask for IG probe into Pentagon's use of COVID-19 funds On The Money: Half of states deplete funds for Trump's 0 unemployment expansion | EU appealing ruling in Apple tax case | House Democrats include more aid for airlines in coronavirus package Warren, Khanna request IG investigation into Pentagon's use of coronavirus funds MORE (D-Mass.) to have the least accessible page, with a 2 rating. South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigeig (D) and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTrump, Biden will not shake hands at first debate due to COVID-19 Sanders tells Maher 'there will be a number of plans' to remove Trump if he loses Sirota reacts to report of harassment, doxing by Harris supporters MORE (I-Vt.) were just slightly ahead with a 2.11 accessibility rating.

The remaining candidates had a score falling somewhere between 2 and 3. 

Both Trump and Weld fell in the middle of Democrats on the accessibility scale, receiving a 2.67 score.

The report highlights the importance of website accessibility, calling it "this generation's wheelchair ramp."

"We cannot sit back while millions of Americans are shut out of a key part of life. Most of them are voters who want to know more about the candidates and their proposed policies. If they cannot access their platforms and beliefs, they are short-changed when it comes to making an informed voting decision," the report says.