Sanders slams questions over age: Judge people by 'what their record is'

Sanders slams questions over age: Judge people by 'what their record is'
© Getty Images

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersDemocratic strategist: 'Medicare for All' exposes generational gap within party Yang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations Biden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee MORE (I-Vt.) slammed questions Thursday about whether he is too old to be president, saying the Democratic presidential candidates should be judged by their records. 

“If I were to say to a younger person, you’re not qualified because you’re 35, 36, something like that, you don’t have the experience, that’s not right, I don’t think so,” the 77-year-old senator said after the second night of the first Democratic primary debates. 

ADVERTISEMENT

“Judge people by the totality of who they are, what their ideas are, what their experience is, what their record is. That’s what I think we should do,” he said.

The comments come after age played a prominent role in the debate, with Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellDemocrats could introduce articles of impeachment next week The Hill's Morning Report - Dem dilemma on articles of impeachment Democrats debate scope of impeachment charges MORE (D-Calif.) calling on former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenHouse Judiciary Committee formally receives impeachment report Democratic strategist: 'Medicare for All' exposes generational gap within party Yang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations MORE, 76, to “pass the torch.” 

“I was 6 years old when a presidential candidate came to the California democratic convention and said it’s time to pass the torch to a new generation of Americans. That candidate was then-Sen. Joe Biden. Joe Biden was right when he said it was time to pass the torch to a new generation of Americans 32 years ago, he’s still right today,” Swalwell said.

Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetBloomberg on 2020 rivals blasting him for using his own money: 'They had a chance to go out and make a lot of money' Senators want FERC to protect critical infrastructure from Huawei threats Krystal Ball: What Harris's exit means for the other 2020 candidates MORE (D-Colo.) voiced similar concerns, though said he wanted a new generation of leadership since politicians have been thus far unable to tackle issues like economic inequality. 

“Forty years of economic immobility in this country, and we haven’t figured out how to address it. I think it’s time for a new generation of leadership in the country, I agree with that,” Bennet said after the debate.

The two-dozen-strong primary field is hosting a diverse array of candidates, with a divide of 40 years between Sanders and 37-year-old South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegDemocratic strategist: 'Medicare for All' exposes generational gap within party Yang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations Biden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee MORE.