Biden says he opposes expanding the Supreme Court

Biden says he opposes expanding the Supreme Court
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Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenGabbard hits DNC over poll criteria for debates The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Moulton says Biden would make 'fantastic president' MORE said that he does not support expanding the Supreme Court, differing from some of his fellow Democratic presidential contenders.

“No, I’m not prepared to go on and try to pack the court, because we’ll live to rue that day,” he told Iowa Starting Line on Thursday.

Biden's comments come after several other 2020 Democratic presidential candidates have indicated that they are open to expanding the Supreme Court or making other judicial reforms.

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Former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeGabbard hits DNC over poll criteria for debates ABC unveils moderators for third Democratic debate The Hill's Morning Report - Trump hews to NRA on guns and eyes lower taxes MORE (D-Texas) and South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegGabbard hits DNC over poll criteria for debates The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Buttigieg unveils plan to strengthen mental health care, fight addiction MORE have both suggested that they could support increasing the number of Supreme Court justices. Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenGabbard hits DNC over poll criteria for debates The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Keystone XL Pipeline gets nod from Nebraska Supreme Court MORE (D-Mass.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisGabbard hits DNC over poll criteria for debates The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Gabbard, Steyer inch toward making third Democratic debate MORE (D-Calif.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Gabbard, Steyer inch toward making third Democratic debate Gillibrand unveils mental health plan MORE (D-N.Y.) have not ruled out the idea, according to a Politico article from earlier this year.

Several progressive leaders have argued that expanding the Supreme Court should be considered to counteract the conservative judges that have been confirmed under President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch To ward off recession, Trump should keep his mouth and smartphone shut Trump: 'Who is our bigger enemy,' Fed chief or Chinese leader? MORE.

But other candidates, including Sens. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerGabbard hits DNC over poll criteria for debates The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Gabbard, Steyer inch toward making third Democratic debate MORE (D-N.J.) and Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetThe Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch The Hill's Morning Report - Trump hews to NRA on guns and eyes lower taxes The Hill's Morning Report - Trump searches for backstops amid recession worries MORE (D-Colo.) have been less interested in expanding the Supreme Court.

Democrats remain frustrated that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDemocrats press FBI, DHS on response to white supremacist violence The Hill's 12:30 Report: Democratic field narrows with Inslee exit McConnell rejects Democrats' 'radical movement' to abolish filibuster MORE (R-Ky.) blocked former President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaDemocratic governors fizzle in presidential race Obamas reportedly buying Martha's Vineyard mansion Trump has 62 percent disapproval rating in new AP poll MORE's final Supreme Court nominee, Merrick GarlandMerrick Brian GarlandLaw professor: Court-packing should be 'last resort' Here's how senators can overcome their hyperpartisanship with judicial nominees McConnell campaign criticized for tombstone with challenger's name MORE.

Biden told Iowa Starting Line that he thinks that he and Obama should have been "a whole heck of a lot harder" on McConnell over the Garland nomination.

The former vice president also said that he would be open to renominating Garland, calling the judge a "first-rate person."

Biden added that he's "not going to seat anybody on the court, lower court or otherwise, who doesn’t support the basic fundamental notion that there’s an inherent right to privacy."

Brian Fallon, executive director of the progressive group Demand Justice, criticized Biden's opposition to expanding the Supreme Court. He also criticized Biden's openness to renominating Garland — who would be 68 in 2021, older than many Trump-appointed judges.

"Biden's comments reflect an anachronistic approach to the Supreme Court that simply won't do in 2020," Fallon said in a statement.

-- Updated at 6:17 p.m.