Biden says he opposes expanding the Supreme Court

Biden says he opposes expanding the Supreme Court
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Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenZuckerberg launches public defense of Facebook as attacks mount Graham: 'Stupid' for Trump to ask China to investigate Biden Romney: Republicans don't criticize Trump because they fear it will help Warren MORE said that he does not support expanding the Supreme Court, differing from some of his fellow Democratic presidential contenders.

“No, I’m not prepared to go on and try to pack the court, because we’ll live to rue that day,” he told Iowa Starting Line on Thursday.

Biden's comments come after several other 2020 Democratic presidential candidates have indicated that they are open to expanding the Supreme Court or making other judicial reforms.

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Former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeAuthorities seize weapons from alleged neo-Nazi leader under 'red flag' law Super PAC seeks to spend more than million supporting Yang Krystal Ball rips media for going 'all-in' on Buttigieg's debate performance MORE (D-Texas) and South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegSunday shows — Mulvaney seeks to tamp down firestorm over quid pro quo comments, Doral decision Buttigieg says he wasn't comfortable with Clinton attack on Gabbard Buttigieg: Trump undermining US credibility 'is going to cost us for years and years' MORE have both suggested that they could support increasing the number of Supreme Court justices. Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenZuckerberg launches public defense of Facebook as attacks mount Warren, Yang fight over automation divides experts Warren says making Israel aid conditional on settlement building is 'on the table' MORE (D-Mass.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisWarren says she will unveil plan to finance 'Medicare for All' Kamala Harris reacts to supporter who got tattoo of her handwriting Even with likely Trump impeachment, Democrats face uphill climb to win presidency MORE (D-Calif.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandSanders seeks spark from Ocasio-Cortez at Queens rally Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — House passes resolution rebuking Trump over Syria | Sparks fly at White House meeting on Syria | Dems say Trump called Pelosi a 'third-rate politician' | Trump, Graham trade jabs Senate confirms Trump's Air Force secretary pick MORE (D-N.Y.) have not ruled out the idea, according to a Politico article from earlier this year.

Several progressive leaders have argued that expanding the Supreme Court should be considered to counteract the conservative judges that have been confirmed under President TrumpDonald John TrumpZuckerberg launches public defense of Facebook as attacks mount Trump leaning toward keeping a couple hundred troops in eastern Syria: report Warren says making Israel aid conditional on settlement building is 'on the table' MORE.

But other candidates, including Sens. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerWarren says she will unveil plan to finance 'Medicare for All' Gabbard hits back at 'queen of warmongers' Clinton The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden camp faces new challenges MORE (D-N.J.) and Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetSenate Democrats want Warren to talk costs on 'Medicare for All' The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden camp faces new challenges Bennet reintroduces bill to ban lawmakers from becoming lobbyists MORE (D-Colo.) have been less interested in expanding the Supreme Court.

Democrats remain frustrated that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTurkey sanctions face possible wall in GOP Senate Fox's Wallace says 'well-connected' Republican told him there's a 20 percent chance GOP will vote for impeachment White House staggers after tumultuous 48 hours MORE (R-Ky.) blocked former President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaCombatting fake news on social media will take a village Is Trudeau on the verge of a shocking reversal of fortune? Even with likely Trump impeachment, Democrats face uphill climb to win presidency MORE's final Supreme Court nominee, Merrick GarlandMerrick Brian GarlandSupreme Court can prove its independence — or its partisan capture The Hill's 12:30 Report: Dems seize on Ukraine transcript in impeachment fight Brett Kavanaugh debate exemplifies culture war between left and right MORE.

Biden told Iowa Starting Line that he thinks that he and Obama should have been "a whole heck of a lot harder" on McConnell over the Garland nomination.

The former vice president also said that he would be open to renominating Garland, calling the judge a "first-rate person."

Biden added that he's "not going to seat anybody on the court, lower court or otherwise, who doesn’t support the basic fundamental notion that there’s an inherent right to privacy."

Brian Fallon, executive director of the progressive group Demand Justice, criticized Biden's opposition to expanding the Supreme Court. He also criticized Biden's openness to renominating Garland — who would be 68 in 2021, older than many Trump-appointed judges.

"Biden's comments reflect an anachronistic approach to the Supreme Court that simply won't do in 2020," Fallon said in a statement.

-- Updated at 6:17 p.m.