Klobuchar: 'I'm not going to make promises just to get elected'

Klobuchar: 'I'm not going to make promises just to get elected'
© Stefani Reynolds

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean Klobuchar 2020 Democrats demand action on guns after Santa Clarita shooting Hillicon Valley: Federal inquiry opened into Google health data deal | Facebook reports millions of post takedowns | Microsoft shakes up privacy debate | Disney plus tops 10M sign-ups in first day Federal inquiry opened into Google health data deal MORE (D-Minn.) defended her policy proposals, which some progressives have criticized for being too centrist when compared to many of her fellow 2020 Democratic presidential candidates. 

"I look people in the eye and I tell them the truth, that I'm honest about how we think we can move forward," Klobuchar said Sunday on NBC's "Meet the Press." 

"I think there’s a lot of people making promises and I'm not going to make promises just to get elected. I am not running for chair of the Democratic National Convention, I am running for president of the United States and that means you bring people together and find that common ground in our own party," she said. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Klobuchar added that she's proposing "bold" plans to help Americans. 

She touted her plan to double federal Pell Grants to help students afford college, which doesn't go as far as proposals from some of her opponents, notably Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersButtigieg surges ahead of Iowa caucuses Biden leads among Latino Democrats in Texas, California On The Money: Trump appeals to Supreme Court to keep tax returns from NY prosecutors | Pelosi says deal on new NAFTA 'imminent' | Mnuchin downplays shutdown threat | Trump hits Fed after Walmart boasts strong earnings MORE (I-Vt.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenButtigieg surges ahead of Iowa caucuses Biden leads among Latino Democrats in Texas, California Following school shooting, Biden speaks out: 'We have to protect these kids' MORE (D-Mass.), who have proposed universal free public college tuition and forgiving student loan debt. 

She defended her plan saying she wants to make sure "that money is going to the people that need it, and not to a bunch of rich kids." 

Klobuchar also said she wants to take on the pharmaceutical industry, and offer a public healthcare option. 

"Those are big bold things that haven't been done," she said. "And some of my colleagues, yes they have I guess you can call them bigger and bigger promises, but I think what's most important to the people of America is we actually get those things done."