Biden says he chose South Carolina as place to apologize for segregationist remarks

Biden says he chose South Carolina as place to apologize for segregationist remarks
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Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden looks to shore up lead in S.C. Hillicon Valley: Dems cancel surveillance vote after pushback to amendments | Facebook to ban certain coronavirus ads | Lawmakers grill online ticketing execs | Hacker accessed facial recognition company's database Vulnerable Democrats brace for Sanders atop ticket MORE said he specifically chose South Carolina as the spot to apologize over comments he made about working with segregationists in the Senate. 

The Associated Press reports Biden said he wanted to choose "an audience that would in fact be most likely to have been offended" by the comments. 

The top-tier 2020 candidate apologized Saturday while campaigning in Sumter, S.C.

“Everything they stood for offended me. They represented everything that I ran against.” Biden said in Sumter, S.C. “I do believe we have work to do, even with those who we find repugnant, to make our system of government to work for all of us. I believe then and I believe now, and I know it can be done without compromising on our principles.” 

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South Carolina is first Southern state to vote in next year's primary and could be key in securing a candidate's nomination. 

Biden had previously refused to apologize over his comments recalling working cordially with segregationists as a Senator. 

He faced backlash from a wide range of his primary opponents.

Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisBiden looks to shore up lead in S.C. House passes historic legislation to make lynching a federal hate crime This week: House to vote on legislation to make lynching a federal hate crime MORE (D-Calif.) called him out during the first round of debates. 

“I do not believe you are a racist and I agree with you when you commit yourself to the importance of finding common ground,” Harris told Biden at the debate. “But I also believe, and it’s personal and I was actually very — it was hurtful to hear you talk about the reputations of two United States senators who built their reputations and career on the segregation of race in this country.”