Biden pledges return to daily press briefings as president

Biden pledges return to daily press briefings as president
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White House hopeful Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden campaign slams Trump's Rose Garden event as 'sad affair' New shutdowns add to Trump woes CNN cuts away from Trump's 'campaign-type' Rose Garden speech MORE vowed his administration would revive daily press briefings, a tradition that has become less and less frequent under President TrumpDonald John TrumpIvanka Trump pitches Goya Foods products on Twitter Sessions defends recusal: 'I leave elected office with my integrity intact' Former White House physician Ronny Jackson wins Texas runoff MORE.

“We believe in the power of free press. That’s why I’ll return immediately to daily press briefings in the White House, the State Department and the Defense Department,” the former vice president said Thursday during a speech on foreign policy. 

Once a regular occurrence, daily White House briefings have become increasingly rare under Trump, who has an acrimonious relationship with mainstream news outlets. The last official White House press briefing was March 11. 

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Reports surfaced last month that White House officials are debating whether to restore the daily news briefing following the departure of former press secretary Sarah HuckabeeSarah Elizabeth SandersMcEnany stamps her brand on White House press operation Sanders mocks NY Times urging DNC to investigate Biden allegations: 'I thought it was an Onion headline' Donald Trump: The Boomer TV president MORE Sanders. Proponents say the communications team should hold at least a daily untelevised briefing, while critics note that Trump prefers to shape the White House message via his personal Twitter account.

Trump announced in January that he told Sanders to stop holding daily press briefings, saying he told her “not to bother” because “the press covers her so rudely & inaccurately.”

“This retreat from transparency and accountability sets a terrible precedent,” White House Correspondents' Association President Olivier Knox said in a statement in response.

“Being able to question the press secretary or other senior government officials publicly helps the news media tell Americans what their most powerful representatives are doing in their name.”