House Dems, Senate GOP build money edge to protect majorities

House Dems, Senate GOP build money edge to protect majorities

The most junior members of the new House Democratic majority spent the last three months building monster campaign accounts to protect their seats, while almost every senator up for reelection padded their early advantage over rivals from the other side.

Campaign fundraising reports filed Monday with the Federal Election Commission show the 44 Democrats who captured Republican-held seats in 2018 raised a collective $22.5 million, more than every Democratic presidential candidate except South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegOvernight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — House Dems advance drug pricing bill | Cases of vaping-related lung illnesses near 1,500 | Juul suspends sales of most e-cigarette flavors Warren raised more money from Big Tech employees than other 2020 Democrats: Report Poll: Biden, Warren support remains unchanged after Democratic debate MORE.

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Thirteen of those freshmen ended the month of June with more than $1 million in the bank, a significant amount of money for such junior members.

Thirty-three of the 36 incumbent Democrats that the party’s campaign committee sees as potentially vulnerable next year raised more than the Republican incumbent who held that seat in the comparable quarter two years ago.

At the front of the pack are several members from California, where Democrats captured seven Republican-held seats last year. Rep. Katie Porter (D) raised more than $1 million in the last quarter, more than any other freshman, while Reps. Josh Harder (D), Harley RoudaHarley Edwin RoudaTestimony from GOP diplomat complicates Trump defense Ex-Trump aide on Russia testifies for 10 hours as part of impeachment inquiry Democratic lawmaker says Barr's reported meeting with Murdoch should be investigated MORE (D) and Katie HillKatherine (Katie) Lauren HillLawmakers beat reporters in annual spelling bee competition Young insurgents aren't rushing to Kennedy's side in Markey fight Polling director: Young voters swayed by health care, economy, gun control MORE (D) all ended the quarter with seven-figure bank balances.

Other Democratic freshmen with more than a million in the bank include Rep. Xochitl Torres Small (N.M.), who won a Republican-held open seat by less than 2 percentage points; New Jersey Reps. Tom MalinowskiThomas (Tom) MalinowskiTestimony from GOP diplomat complicates Trump defense Pelosi: No House vote on impeachment inquiry Democrats gauge support for vote on impeachment inquiry MORE and Mikie SherrillRebecca (Mikie) Michelle SherrillHouse Dems introduce bill to fight social media disinformation CNN faces backlash for video highlighting white congresswomen as impeachment leaders GOP ratchets up 2020 attacks as impeachment storm grows MORE; Michigan Reps. Haley StevensHaley Maria StevensPelosi-backed group funding ads for vulnerable Democrats amid impeachment inquiry Trump impeachment calls snowball, putting pressure on Pelosi Pro-Trump Republican immigrant to challenge Dem lawmaker who flipped Michigan seat MORE and Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinHouse Dems introduce bill to fight social media disinformation Polls flash warning signs for Trump on impeachment Pelosi-backed group funding ads for vulnerable Democrats amid impeachment inquiry MORE and New York Reps. Max RoseMax RoseHillicon Valley: FCC approves T-Mobile-Sprint merger | Dems wrangle over breaking up Big Tech at debate | Critics pounce as Facebook's Libra stumbles | Zuckerberg to be interviewed by Fox News | Twitter details rules for political figures' tweets Democratic lawmakers press for white supremacist groups to be labeled foreign terrorist organizations Bottom Line MORE and Antonio DelgadoAntonio Ramon DelgadoProgressive Latino group launches first incumbent protection campaign Trump impeachment battle hits TV ads Pelosi-backed group funding ads for vulnerable Democrats amid impeachment inquiry MORE.

All told, the 44 Democratic freshmen are sitting on stockpiles that total $36 million.

In the Senate, only one incumbent — Sen. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyThe Hill's Morning Report - Dem debate contenders take aim at Warren Schumer seeks focus on health care amid impeachment fever Trump-GOP tensions over Syria show signs of easing MORE (R-Ariz.) — raised less money than her likely general election opponent, retired astronaut Mark Kelly (D), who pulled in $4.2 million.

But, in a testament to Kelly’s fundraising prowess and to McSally’s own skills, the freshman Republican raised more money in the last quarter, $3 million, than any other incumbent senator, including both Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellOvernight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Pence says Turkey agrees to ceasefire | Senators vow to move forward with Turkey sanctions | Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe On The Money: Senate fails to override Trump veto over border emergency | Trump resort to host G-7 next year | Senators to push Turkey sanctions despite ceasefire | McConnell tees up funding votes McConnell tees up government funding votes amid stalemate MORE (R-Ky.) and Senate Majority Whip John CornynJohn CornynTrump slams 'very dumb' O'Rourke for proposals on guns, tax exempt status for churches GOP cautions Graham against hauling Biden before Senate Succession at DHS up in the air as Trump set to nominate new head MORE (R-Texas).

Cornyn has more money in the bank, $9 million, than any other senator seeking reelection this year, trailed closely by McConnell, with just under $7.9 million on hand.

On the other side of the aisle, Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.) leads the way with $4.2 million on hand, after he pulled in $1.8 million in the last quarter. Jones, seeking reelection in a state President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocratic senator rips Trump's 'let them fight' remarks: 'Enough is enough' Warren warns Facebook may help reelect Trump 'and profit off of it' Trump touts Turkey cease-fire: 'Sometimes you have to let them fight' MORE won by 28 percentage points, is the most vulnerable member up for reelection next year.

Sen. Gary PetersGary Charles PetersPoll shows Sen. Gary Peters with slim lead over GOP rival in Michigan From foster care to forever home Republican challenger to Gary Peters in Michigan raises over million MORE (D-Mich.) raised $2.2 million in the last quarter and ended with $4.7 million in the bank. His likely rival, 2018 candidate John James (R), pulled in $1.5 million in his first quarter in the race.

Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenGraham, Van Hollen introduce Turkey sanctions bill Senators fear Syria damage 'irreversible' after Esper, Milley briefing US envoy insists Syria pullout doesn't affect Iran strategy MORE (D-N.H.) ended the quarter with almost $2.9 million on hand. Retired Army Brig. Gen. Don Bolduc, the GOP’s preferred candidate, entered the race just days before the end of the quarter and has not reported his fundraising yet.

Republicans hold a 53-47 seat edge in the Senate, and the GOP is defending 22 of the 34 seats up for election this year. Many Democratic challengers have only just begun to campaign and raise money seriously, setting them well behind the incumbents they will challenge.

In Iowa, businesswoman Theresa Greenfield (D) pulled in $625,000 in the month between her formal decision to challenge Sen. Joni ErnstJoni Kay ErnstGOP cautions Graham against hauling Biden before Senate Farmers: New Trump ethanol proposal reneged on previous deal Overnight Energy: Farmers say EPA reneged on ethanol deal | EPA scrubs senators' quotes from controversial ethanol announcement | Perry unsure if he'll comply with subpoena | John Kerry criticizes lack of climate talk at debate MORE (R) and the end of the quarter. She ended with about $600,000 in the bank, less than a fifth of the $3.4 million Ernst has on hand.

In Maine, state House Speaker Sara Gideon (D) announced her campaign after the end of the quarter, though her campaign said it had pulled in $1 million in its first 10 days. She has work to do to catch up to Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Energy: Perry to step down as Energy secretary | Future of big-game hunting council up in the air | Dems lose vote against EPA power plant rule Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Pence says Turkey agrees to ceasefire | Senators vow to move forward with Turkey sanctions | Mulvaney walks back comments tying Ukraine aid to 2016 probe On The Money: Senate fails to override Trump veto over border emergency | Trump resort to host G-7 next year | Senators to push Turkey sanctions despite ceasefire | McConnell tees up funding votes MORE (R), who is sitting on a $5.4 million campaign account.

And in Colorado, Sen. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerBennet reintroduces bill to ban lawmakers from becoming lobbyists GOP warns Graham letter to Pelosi on impeachment could 'backfire' The Hill's Morning Report - Dem debate contenders take aim at Warren MORE (R) raised $2 million and sits on $4.9 million. The Democrats running against him combined to raise more than the incumbent Republican, but they will spend much of that money on next year’s June 30 primary. A dozen candidates are already running for the right to face Gardner, and at least one other prominent candidate is considering entering the race.

Republican Party committees hold a financial advantage so far this year, entirely thanks to the Republican National Committee’s (RNC) strong fundraising performance ahead of Trump’s reelection bid. The RNC had $37 million in the bank at the end of May, the latest figures available. The Democratic National Committee has just $8.2 million on hand, and nearly $6 million in remaining debt.

The National Republican Congressional Committee held $20 million in reserves, slightly more than the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee’s $17 million. And the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) had $13 million on hand, more than the National Republican Senatorial Committee’s (NRSC) $11.2 million. The NRSC still owes vendors $6 million, while the DSCC owes debts of $16.9 million.

The party committees must report their fundraising results each month. The reports for June are due at the weekend.