Moulton campaign makes formal case to DNC to be added to debate stage

Moulton campaign makes formal case to DNC to be added to debate stage
© Greg Nash

Rep. Seth MoultonSeth Wilbur MoultonMoulton, Stewart pen op-ed backing three-digit suicide prevention hotline 2020 Democrats react to NYPD firing of officer in Garner case: 'Finally' Biden, Buttigieg bypassing Democratic delegate meeting: report MORE (D-Mass.) is calling on the Democratic National Convention (DNC) to reconsider allowing him on presidential primary debate stage after he was again excluded from the upcoming lineup. 

Moulton's campaign submitted a letter to the DNC citing 12 polls that show the Marine Corps veteran reaching the 1 percent support threshold. 

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The campaign says the listed polls "meet methodology" required by the party and are run by organizations with a passing rate according to FiveThirtyEight. 

"Some are more highly rated or more accurate over time than some of the polls that do count," the letter continues.

According to a copy of the form the campaign submitted to the DNC shared with The Hill, Moulton reached 1 percent in the following polls: Emerson, Rasmussen/HarrisX, Morning Consult, McLaughlin & Associates, Hill/HarrisX, Economist/YouGov, Crooked Media/Change Research. 

None of those polls are among the DNC's approved organizations list.  

The letter also says the campaign raised more money in the second quarter of 2019 than five candidates who were on the first debate stage: New York Mayor Bill de BlasioBill de BlasioThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden expands lead in new national poll De Blasio brushes off low poll numbers: 'The vast majority of Democratic voters are going to make their decision late' NYPD fires officer in Eric Garner case MORE, Rep. John DelaneyJohn Kevin DelaneyDelaney shakes up top campaign staff Poll: Nearly 4 in 5 say they will consider candidates' stances on cybersecurity Native American advocates question 2020 Democrats' commitment MORE (Md.), Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) John RyanBiden, Buttigieg bypassing Democratic delegate meeting: report Tim Ryan jokes he's having 'dance-off' with Andrew Yang The Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape MORE (Ohio) and former Colorado Gov. John HickenlooperJohn HickenlooperPoll: Trump trails three Democrats by 10 points in Colorado The Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape The Hill's Morning Report — Trump and the new Israel-'squad' controversy MORE.

Moulton was one of two Democratic candidates barred from both debates, alongside Miramar, Fla., Mayor Wayne MessamWayne Martin Messam2020 Democrats release joint statement ahead of Trump's New Hampshire rally The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump claims support in Congress for background checks Moulton campaign makes formal case to DNC to be added to debate stage MORE

Billionaire investor Tom SteyerThomas (Tom) Fahr SteyerThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden expands lead in new national poll Castro qualifies for next Democratic primary debates Castro, Steyer join pledge opposing the Keystone XL pipeline MORE and former Rep. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.), who entered the race after the first debate, also did not qualify for the upcoming Detroit debates which will be hosted by CNN.

The only new candidate to take the stage on July 30 or 31 is Montana Gov. Steve BullockSteve BullockCan Steve Bullock win? Harry Reid: 'Decriminalizing border crossings is not something that should be at the top of the list' Sunday shows - Recession fears dominate MORE (D), who replaces Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellHickenlooper ends presidential bid Scenes from Iowa State Fair: Surging Warren, Harris draw big crowds Nadler hits gas on impeachment MORE (D-Calif.), who dropped out. 

To qualify for the debate, candidates had to reach at least 1 percent support in three polls approved by the DNC or campaign contributions from 65,000 individual donors. 

The DNC's qualifications for the third debate are higher. To get on stage, the two dozen candidates will have to receive 2 percent or more in support from at least four polls and certify their campaigns have received donations from a minimum of 130,000 individual donors.