Biden: We won't truly speak as one voice against hatred until Trump is out of White House

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenAre Democrats turning Trump-like? Volatile presidential polls spark new round of anxieties British Bookmaker: Warren has replaced Biden as Democratic primary favorite MORE said on Monday that the U.S. will not be able to unite against hatred until President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump watching 'very closely' as Portland braces for dueling protests WaPo calls Trump admin 'another threat' to endangered species Are Democrats turning Trump-like? MORE leaves office. 

"Let's be very clear. You use the office of the presidency to encourage and embolden white supremacy. You use words like 'infestation' and 'invasion' to talk about human beings," 2020 contender Biden said in a tweet. "We won't truly speak with one voice against hatred until your voice is no longer in the White House." 

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Trump addressed the nation from the White House on Monday, calling on Americans to condemn white supremacy after the alleged gunman in El Paso was believed to have written an anti-immigrant manifesto.

“The shooter in El Paso posted a manifesto online consumed with racist hate,” Trump said at the White House. “In one voice, our nation must condemn bigotry, hatred and white supremacy."

"These sinister ideologies must be defeated," he continued.

Trump suggested in a tweet earlier on Monday that he would support connecting stricter background checks on gun buyers to immigration reform legislation.

 

 

Democratic presidential contenders have come out in force to condemn Trump's response to last weekend's mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio. 

A number of the candidates have said Trump's way of addressing the shootings is insufficient, while others, like former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeHillicon Valley: O'Rourke proposal targets tech's legal shield | Dem wants public review of FCC agreement with T-Mobile, Sprint | Voters zero in on cybersecurity | Instagram to let users flag misinformation O'Rourke proposes holding tech platforms accountable for hate speech The Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape MORE (D-Texas) have said Trump's rhetoric contributed to the shooting in El Paso.