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Sanders, Warren gain on Biden in New Hampshire

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenMissouri woman seen with Pelosi sign charged in connection with Capitol riots Facebook temporarily bans ads for weapons accessories following Capitol riots Sasse, in fiery op-ed, says QAnon is destroying GOP MORE has a small lead over Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSenate Democrats leery of nixing filibuster 'Almost Heaven, West Virginia' — Joe Manchin and a 50-50 Senate Biden to seek minimum wage in COVID-19 proposal MORE (I-Vt.) in the first-in-the-nation primary state of New Hampshire, but Sanders and Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenPorter loses seat on House panel overseeing financial sector OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Nine, including former Michigan governor, charged over Flint water crisis | Regulator finalizes rule forcing banks to serve oil, gun companies | Trump admin adds hurdle to increase efficiency standards for furnaces, water heaters DeVos mulled unilateral student loan forgiveness as COVID-19 wracked economy: memo MORE (D-Mass.) posted solid gains and are closing the gap on the front-runner, according to a new poll.

The latest Suffolk University-Boston Globe poll finds Biden at 21 percent support, followed by Sanders at 17 percent and Warren at 14 percent. No other candidate has double-digit support in the Granite State.

Sanders and Warren were the poll’s biggest gainers, picking up 5 points and 6 points, respectively, over the same poll from April.

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Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisHarris to be sworn in by Justice Sotomayor using Thurgood Marshall's Bible In calling out Trump, Nikki Haley warns of a more sinister threat On The Money: Retail sales drop in latest sign of weakening economy | Fast-food workers strike for minimum wage | US officials raise concerns over Mexico's handling of energy permits MORE (D-Calif.) is in fourth place at 8 percent support, followed by South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegOn The Money: Retail sales drop in latest sign of weakening economy | Fast-food workers strike for minimum wage | US officials raise concerns over Mexico's handling of energy permits Buttigieg confirmation hearing slated for Thursday James Murdoch predicts 'a reckoning' for media after Capitol riot MORE at 6 percent and Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardTulsi Gabbard blasts new House rules on gender neutral language as 'height of hypocrisy' A vaccine, a Burrito and more: 7 lighter, memorable moments from 2020 Growing number of House Republicans warm to proxy voting MORE (D-Hawaii) at 3 percent. Sen. Cory BookerCory BookerSunday shows preview: Washington prepares for an inauguration and impeachment; coronavirus surges across the US NCAA tables name, image and likeness vote after DOJ warns of potential antitrust violations Warren and other senators seek investigation into Trump administration resuming federal executions MORE (D-N.J.) is at 1 percent support and former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D) registered 0 percent support.

The latest Suffolk poll shows a significantly tighter race than the same survey in late April, which found Biden in the lead at 20 percent, followed by Sanders and Buttigieg at 12 percent, Warren at 8 percent and Harris at 6 percent.

Gabbard was at 1 percent support in the prior poll and got a little bump that will push her closer to qualifying for the next debate in September in Houston.

Sanders’s support is the firmest in the field, with 48 percent of his supporters saying they will definitely support him, followed by 45 percent of Biden’s supporters and 35 percent of Warren’s supporters who said they will not change their minds.

But Warren might have the most room to grow, with 21 percent describing her as their second choice, making her the top back-up candidate in the field. Sixty percent of voters overall said they still might change their minds.

“This is an especially important number now that a number of candidates could drop out soon and shows how she could grow,” said David Paleologos, the director of the Suffolk University Political Research Center.

The survey of 500 likely Democratic primary voters in New Hampshire was conducted between Aug. 1 and 4 and has a 4.4 percentage-point margin of error.