Steve King to Gillibrand: Odds of me resigning same as yours of winning presidential nomination

Steve King to Gillibrand: Odds of me resigning same as yours of winning presidential nomination
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Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingMother of child in viral meme sends Steve King cease-and-desist for using image in fundraising Nebraska Democratic Party Chair: Rural vote should be 'bedrock' of party With surge in anti-Semitism, political leaders need to be aggressive and reflective in response MORE (R-Iowa) sparred with Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandNow is the time for a US data protection agency The Hill's Campaign Report: Warren up, Bloomberg down after brutal debate Ginsburg, accepting lifetime achievement award, urges working fathers to take an active role in kids' lives MORE (D-N.Y.) on Thursday night over the Democratic presidential candidate's call for him to resign, retorting that the odds of his stepping down from Congress were equal to hers of winning the party's nomination to take on President TrumpDonald John TrumpSchiff blasts Trump for making 'false claims' about Russia intel: 'You've betrayed America. Again.' Poll: Sanders leads 2020 Democratic field with 28 percent, followed by Warren and Biden More than 6 in 10 expect Trump to be reelected: poll MORE in 2020.

"Kiersten: [sic] Odds of my resigning are the same as yours of winning the nomination for POTUS: ZERO," King tweeted, taking aim at Gillibrand's pro-choice stance.

 

Gillibrand, responding to King's Thursday tweet, wrote, "You know when you’re getting under Steve King’s skin this much, you’re doing something right." 

The back-and-forth came after Gillibrand on Wednesday called for the embattled nine-term congressman to step down from his position after King questioned whether there would be "any population of the world left" if not for rape and incest throughout history.

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"What if we went back through all the family trees and just pulled out anyone who was a product of rape or incest? Would there be any population of the world left if we did that?" King told a crowd at the Westside Conservative Club. “Considering all the wars and all the rapes and pillages that happened throughout all these different nations, I know that I can't say that I was not a part of a product of that."

King was speaking in Urbandale, Iowa, where he defended anti-abortion legislation he sponsored in Congress that did not have exceptions for rape or incest.

Other Democratic presidential hopefuls, including Sens. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerNew Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy announces tumor on kidney, will undergo treatment The Hill's 12:30 Report: Dem anxiety grows ahead of Super Tuesday House to vote on legislation to make lynching a federal hate crime MORE (N.J.), Bernie SandersBernie SandersSchiff blasts Trump for making 'false claims' about Russia intel: 'You've betrayed America. Again.' Buttigieg campaign claims 'irregularities' in Nevada caucuses Poll: Sanders leads 2020 Democratic field with 28 percent, followed by Warren and Biden MORE (I-Vt.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenPoll: Sanders leads 2020 Democratic field with 28 percent, followed by Warren and Biden More than 6 in 10 expect Trump to be reelected: poll Sanders has wide leads in two of three battleground states: survey MORE (D-Mass.) called for King's resignation. Members of King's party, including House Republican Conference Chairwoman Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyOvernight Defense: GOP lawmaker takes unannounced trip to Syria | Taliban leader pens New York Times op-ed on peace talks | Cheney blasts paper for publishing op-ed Liz Cheney blasts NYT for publishing op-ed by Taliban leader Minnesota congressman diagnosed with cancer MORE (Wyo.), hit the congressman over his remarks.

King sparked bipartisan backlash in January for questioning during an interview with The New York Times how terms such as "white supremacist" and "white nationalist" became "offensive."

The comments were quickly denounced and House Republicans responded by removing King from his positions on the House Judiciary, Agriculture and Small Business committees.