Steve King to Gillibrand: Odds of me resigning same as yours of winning presidential nomination

Steve King to Gillibrand: Odds of me resigning same as yours of winning presidential nomination
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Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingKing doubles down, says rape, incest should not be factored in to abortion decisions Steve King defends remarks on rape, incest The Hill's Morning Report - Trump on defense over economic jitters MORE (R-Iowa) sparred with Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandDemocratic candidates face hard choices as 2020 field winnows The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Gabbard, Steyer inch toward making third Democratic debate MORE (D-N.Y.) on Thursday night over the Democratic presidential candidate's call for him to resign, retorting that the odds of his stepping down from Congress were equal to hers of winning the party's nomination to take on President TrumpDonald John TrumpGraham: America must 'accept the pain that comes in standing up to China' Weld 'thrilled' more Republicans are challenging Trump New data challenges Trump's economic narrative MORE in 2020.

"Kiersten: [sic] Odds of my resigning are the same as yours of winning the nomination for POTUS: ZERO," King tweeted, taking aim at Gillibrand's pro-choice stance.

 

Gillibrand, responding to King's Thursday tweet, wrote, "You know when you’re getting under Steve King’s skin this much, you’re doing something right." 

The back-and-forth came after Gillibrand on Wednesday called for the embattled nine-term congressman to step down from his position after King questioned whether there would be "any population of the world left" if not for rape and incest throughout history.

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"What if we went back through all the family trees and just pulled out anyone who was a product of rape or incest? Would there be any population of the world left if we did that?" King told a crowd at the Westside Conservative Club. “Considering all the wars and all the rapes and pillages that happened throughout all these different nations, I know that I can't say that I was not a part of a product of that."

King was speaking in Urbandale, Iowa, where he defended anti-abortion legislation he sponsored in Congress that did not have exceptions for rape or incest.

Other Democratic presidential hopefuls, including Sens. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerSteyer calls on DNC to expand polling criteria for debates Gabbard hits DNC over poll criteria for debates The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch MORE (N.J.), Bernie SandersBernie SandersTrump preps conspiracy theory to explain faltering economy Sanders doubles down on 'Medicare For All' defense: 'We have not changed one word' Sanders, Warren back major shift to fight drug overdoses MORE (I-Vt.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenTrump preps conspiracy theory to explain faltering economy Sanders, Warren back major shift to fight drug overdoses Rendell: Biden 'baked in' as Democratic nominee MORE (D-Mass.) called for King's resignation. Members of King's party, including House Republican Conference Chairwoman Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneySteve King defends remarks on rape, incest The Hill's Morning Report - Trump hews to NRA on guns and eyes lower taxes Dick Cheney to attend fundraiser supporting Trump reelection: report MORE (Wyo.), hit the congressman over his remarks.

King sparked bipartisan backlash in January for questioning during an interview with The New York Times how terms such as "white supremacist" and "white nationalist" became "offensive."

The comments were quickly denounced and House Republicans responded by removing King from his positions on the House Judiciary, Agriculture and Small Business committees.