Pro-Trump Republican immigrant to challenge Dem lawmaker who flipped Michigan seat

Republican Whittney Williams, a President TrumpDonald John TrumpCNN's Anderson Cooper: Trump's Bubba Wallace tweet was 'racist, just plain and simple' Beats by Dre announces deal with Bubba Wallace, defends him after Trump remarks Overnight Defense: DOD reportedly eyeing Confederate flag ban | House military spending bill blocks wall funding MORE supporter who used to live in the U.S. illegally, on Monday announced that she would be launching a campaign to challenge Michigan Rep. Haley StevensHaley Maria StevensThe Hill's Campaign Report: Buzz builds around Warren for VP Gun control group rolls out House endorsements Human Rights Campaign rolls out congressional endorsements on Equality Act anniversary MORE (D) for the 11th District seat Stevens flipped blue during the 2018 midterms.

Williams, 37, said in an announcement video that she was brought to the United States at the age of 10 from Taiwan “without knowing a word of English.”

“My family overstayed their visas and, as a result, I spent the next 16 years living in the shadows as an illegal immigrant,” Williams said. 

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Williams, the director of diversity for Michigan’s 11th Congressional District Republican Committee, married her husband and gained citizenship in 2013, her campaign said in a statement to news site Mlive.com.

“Now as a citizen, I want to help change the Washington culture,” she says in her announcement video. “I’m sick and tired of political games, and I’m sure you are too. When I’ll go to Congress as a pro-life conservative who supports strong border security, Democrats are going to have a hard time using their typical playbook against me.”

Trump has made hardline immigration policies a keystone of his administration, including rescinding the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, the Obama-era action that allowed children brought into the country illegally to remain. A federal appeals court ruled in May that Trump’s decision to terminate the program was unlawful. 

Williams touted Trump’s record on unemployment and the economy, while showing a picture of the so-called “Squad” of progressive minority congresswomen — Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezDemocratic strategist Andrew Feldman says Biden is moving left Hispanic Caucus asks Trump to rescind invitation to Mexican president Nadler wins Democratic primary MORE (D-N.Y.), Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarThe Hill's Campaign Report: Colorado, Utah primary results bring upsets, intrigue Progressive lawmakers call for conditions on Israel aid Black lives and the CBC: What happens to a dream deferred? MORE (D-Minn.), Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibThe Hill's Campaign Report: Colorado, Utah primary results bring upsets, intrigue Progressive lawmakers call for conditions on Israel aid Ocasio-Cortez pitches interns to work for her instead of McConnell MORE (D-Mich.) and Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyThe Hill's Campaign Report: Colorado, Utah primary results bring upsets, intrigue Progressives zero in on another House chairman in primary Ocasio-Cortez pitches interns to work for her instead of McConnell MORE (D-Mass.)

“I want to further this economic success and fight back against the radical left’s socialist agenda,” she said.

This is Williams’s first run for office, MLive.com reported.

Stevens, an ex-Obama official, won the district by nearly 7 percentage points during November’s midterm election.

The seat was previously occupied by Rep. Dave TrottDavid Alan TrottFormer GOP Michigan congressman says Trump is unfit for office Pro-Trump Republican immigrant to challenge Dem lawmaker who flipped Michigan seat Meet the lawmakers putting politics aside to save our climate MORE (R), who did not seek reelection. 

As of June 30, Stevens has raised $1.3 million for her 2020 campaign.

Both candidates running in the district outside of Detroit have experience in the automotive industry. 

Stevens is the former chief of staff for former President Obama's auto task force, and Williams's website states that she worked as an U.S. auto show product specialist.