Sanders doubles down on 'Medicare For All' defense: 'We have not changed one word'

Sanders doubles down on 'Medicare For All' defense: 'We have not changed one word'
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Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersWarren overtakes Biden in Iowa for first time: poll The polls are asking the wrong question Sanders unveils plan to eliminate Americans' medical debt MORE (I-Vt.), a 2020 White House hopeful, on Sunday dismissed criticism that he is backtracking on his "Medicare For All" plan. 

"We have not changed one word," Sanders said of the plan on CNN's "State of the Union" when asked about "2020 rivals" attacking him for tweaking its impact on union workers. 

"Very few people have been attacking me, I think one candidate and the media picks up on it," Sanders responded. 

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Three candidates or their campaigns, Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisWarren overtakes Biden in Iowa for first time: poll Iowa GOP swipes at 2020 Democrats' meat positions as candidates attend annual Steak Fry Warren avoids attacks while building momentum MORE (D-Calif.), Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetThe Hill's Campaign Report: De Blasio drops out | Warren gains support from black voters | Sanders retools campaign team | Warning signs for Tillis in NC Williamson: Climate change result of an 'amoral' economic system Bennet: 'This generation has a lot to be really angry at us about' MORE (D-Colo.) and former Rep. John DelaneyJohn Kevin Delaney2020 Democrats defend climate priorities in MSNBC forum The Hill's Campaign Report: De Blasio drops out | Warren gains support from black voters | Sanders retools campaign team | Warning signs for Tillis in NC Analysis: 2020 digital spending vastly outpaces TV ads MORE (D-Md.), called out Sanders over the tweak. 

Last week, Sanders unveiled a plan that in part includes benefits for union workers who would be giving up their private insurance. 

He said on Sunday, however, that that does not change his plan. 

Sanders said "union workers gave up wage benefits over the years in order to pay for health care and non-union workers did not," when asked why non-union workers would not receive a benefit for giving up their private insurance

He also repeated his claim that Americans would pay less under his Medicare For All plan, by forgoing premiums and copayments.