Sanders doubles down on 'Medicare For All' defense: 'We have not changed one word'

Sanders doubles down on 'Medicare For All' defense: 'We have not changed one word'
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Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersHillicon Valley: Apple rolls out coronavirus screening app, website | Pompeo urged to crack down on coronavirus misinformation from China | Senators push FTC on price gouging | Instacart workers threaten strike Overnight Energy: Court upholds Trump repeal of Obama fracking rule | Oil price drop threatens fracking boom | EPA eases rules on gasoline sales amid coronavirus The Hill's Campaign Report: Sanders pushes on in 2020 race MORE (I-Vt.), a 2020 White House hopeful, on Sunday dismissed criticism that he is backtracking on his "Medicare For All" plan. 

"We have not changed one word," Sanders said of the plan on CNN's "State of the Union" when asked about "2020 rivals" attacking him for tweaking its impact on union workers. 

"Very few people have been attacking me, I think one candidate and the media picks up on it," Sanders responded. 

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Three candidates or their campaigns, Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHillicon Valley: Apple rolls out coronavirus screening app, website | Pompeo urged to crack down on coronavirus misinformation from China | Senators push FTC on price gouging | Instacart workers threaten strike Democratic Senators urge FTC to prevent coronavirus price gouging Democratic senators call on FDA to drop restrictions on blood donations from men who have sex with men MORE (D-Calif.), Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetHillicon Valley: Facebook launches portal for coronavirus information | EU sees spike in Russian misinformation on outbreak | Senate Dem bill would encourage mail-in voting | Lawmakers question safety of Google virus website We need a massive economic response to counter the threat of the coronavirus Senator calls for cybersecurity review at health agencies after hacking incident MORE (D-Colo.) and former Rep. John DelaneyJohn DelaneyJohn Delaney endorses Biden Nevada caucuses open with a few hiccups Lobbying world MORE (D-Md.), called out Sanders over the tweak. 

Last week, Sanders unveiled a plan that in part includes benefits for union workers who would be giving up their private insurance. 

He said on Sunday, however, that that does not change his plan. 

Sanders said "union workers gave up wage benefits over the years in order to pay for health care and non-union workers did not," when asked why non-union workers would not receive a benefit for giving up their private insurance

He also repeated his claim that Americans would pay less under his Medicare For All plan, by forgoing premiums and copayments.