Sanders doubles down on 'Medicare For All' defense: 'We have not changed one word'

Sanders doubles down on 'Medicare For All' defense: 'We have not changed one word'
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Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden wins Louisiana primary Oh, Canada: Should the US emulate Canada's National Health Service? Trump glosses over virus surge during Florida trip MORE (I-Vt.), a 2020 White House hopeful, on Sunday dismissed criticism that he is backtracking on his "Medicare For All" plan. 

"We have not changed one word," Sanders said of the plan on CNN's "State of the Union" when asked about "2020 rivals" attacking him for tweaking its impact on union workers. 

"Very few people have been attacking me, I think one candidate and the media picks up on it," Sanders responded. 

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Last week, Sanders unveiled a plan that in part includes benefits for union workers who would be giving up their private insurance. 

He said on Sunday, however, that that does not change his plan. 

Sanders said "union workers gave up wage benefits over the years in order to pay for health care and non-union workers did not," when asked why non-union workers would not receive a benefit for giving up their private insurance

He also repeated his claim that Americans would pay less under his Medicare For All plan, by forgoing premiums and copayments.