Sanders doubles down on 'Medicare For All' defense: 'We have not changed one word'

Sanders doubles down on 'Medicare For All' defense: 'We have not changed one word'
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Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersDemocrats ask if they have reason to worry about UK result Buttigieg releases list of campaign bundlers Reject National Defense Authorization Act, save Yemen instead MORE (I-Vt.), a 2020 White House hopeful, on Sunday dismissed criticism that he is backtracking on his "Medicare For All" plan. 

"We have not changed one word," Sanders said of the plan on CNN's "State of the Union" when asked about "2020 rivals" attacking him for tweaking its impact on union workers. 

"Very few people have been attacking me, I think one candidate and the media picks up on it," Sanders responded. 

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Three candidates or their campaigns, Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisSanders revokes congressional endorsement for Young Turks founder Cenk Uygur The Hill's Campaign Report: 2020 Democrats trading jabs ahead of Los Angeles debate New poll finds Sanders surging to within 7 points of Biden in South Carolina MORE (D-Calif.), Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetYang: 2020 rivals in Senate should be able to campaign amid impeachment Trump trade deal likely to sow division in Democratic presidential field Schumer to colleagues running for White House: Impeachment comes first MORE (D-Colo.) and former Rep. John DelaneyJohn Kevin DelaneyDemocrats ask if they have reason to worry about UK result The great AI debate: What candidates are (finally) saying about artificial intelligence Delaney to DNC: Open second debate stage for candidates who qualified for past events MORE (D-Md.), called out Sanders over the tweak. 

Last week, Sanders unveiled a plan that in part includes benefits for union workers who would be giving up their private insurance. 

He said on Sunday, however, that that does not change his plan. 

Sanders said "union workers gave up wage benefits over the years in order to pay for health care and non-union workers did not," when asked why non-union workers would not receive a benefit for giving up their private insurance

He also repeated his claim that Americans would pay less under his Medicare For All plan, by forgoing premiums and copayments.