10 Democrats set to debate after other half falls short

 10 Democrats set to debate after other half falls short
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Ten Democrats running for president are likely to have qualified for the primary debate next month after the Democratic National Committee’s (DNC) deadline to meet its criteria passed on Wednesday night.

That is half of the 20 Democrats who took part in the two previous debates after the DNC doubled the thresholds to make the stage. It will likely mean the debate will take over only one night, on Sept. 12. 

The previous two debates in June and July were spread over a total of four nights, as the DNC has capped the maximum number of candidates who can debate at once at 10.

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For the September debate, the DNC required each candidate to reach 130,000 unique donors and at least 2 percent support in four DNC-approved polls to qualify.

Ten candidates have met those requirements: Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenGiuliani clashes with CNN's Cuomo, calls him a 'sellout' and the 'enemy' Giuliani says 'of course' he asked Ukraine to look into Biden seconds after denying it Trump whistleblower complaint involves Ukraine: report MORE; Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersOvernight Health Care — Presented by Partnership for America's Health Care Future — Pelosi unveils signature plan to lower drug prices | Trump says it's 'great to see' plan | Progressives pushing for changes Krystal Ball calls on Sanders to follow Yang's lead on war on drugs Buttigieg calls Warren 'evasive' on Medicare for all MORE (I-Vt.); Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenOvernight Health Care — Presented by Partnership for America's Health Care Future — Pelosi unveils signature plan to lower drug prices | Trump says it's 'great to see' plan | Progressives pushing for changes Buttigieg calls Warren 'evasive' on Medicare for all Sanders hits 1 million donors MORE (D-Mass.); Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisTwo former Congressional Black Caucus chairmen back Biden Strippers, 'Hustlers' and the Democratic debates 2020 Dems honor Emily Clyburn MORE (D-Calif.); South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegOvernight Health Care — Presented by Partnership for America's Health Care Future — Pelosi unveils signature plan to lower drug prices | Trump says it's 'great to see' plan | Progressives pushing for changes Buttigieg calls Warren 'evasive' on Medicare for all Overnight Energy: Trump officials formally revoke California emissions waiver | EPA's Wheeler dodges questions about targeting San Francisco over homelessness | 2020 Dems duke it out at second climate forum MORE; Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerOvernight Energy: Trump officials formally revoke California emissions waiver | EPA's Wheeler dodges questions about targeting San Francisco over homelessness | 2020 Dems duke it out at second climate forum Two former Congressional Black Caucus chairmen back Biden Strippers, 'Hustlers' and the Democratic debates MORE (D-N.J.); Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharDemocrats will not beat Trump without moderate policy ideas Harris revamps campaign presence in Iowa Sanders, Yang to miss CNN's town hall on LGBTQ issues MORE (D-Minn.); former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas); former tech executive Andrew YangAndrew YangKrystal Ball calls on Sanders to follow Yang's lead on war on drugs Overnight Energy: Trump officials formally revoke California emissions waiver | EPA's Wheeler dodges questions about targeting San Francisco over homelessness | 2020 Dems duke it out at second climate forum Again, DNC debate moderators fail to ask about democracy issues MORE; and former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro.

The 10 remaining candidates in the Democratic field appear likely to have failed to make the stage: billionaire hedge fund executive Tom SteyerThomas (Tom) Fahr SteyerSanders, Yang to miss CNN's town hall on LGBTQ issues CNN announces details for LGBTQ town hall New poll finds Biden, Warren in virtual tie in Iowa MORE; Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardKavanaugh book author on impeachment calls: 'That's not our determination to make' Trump's 'soldier of fortune' foreign policy Beto needs to revive talk about his 'war tax' proposal MORE (D-Hawaii); Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetWilliamson: Climate change result of an 'amoral' economic system Bennet: 'This generation has a lot to be really angry at us about' Democrats seize Senate floor to protest gun inaction: 'Put up or shut up' MORE (D-Colo.); Montana Gov. Steve BullockSteve BullockNew poll finds Biden, Warren in virtual tie in Iowa Gabbard drives coverage in push to qualify for October debate Partisan divisions sharpen as independent voters fade MORE; Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) John RyanWilliamson: Climate change result of an 'amoral' economic system Overnight Energy: Top presidential candidates to skip second climate forum | Group sues for info on 'attempts to politicize' NOAA | Trump allows use of oil reserve after Saudi attacks Five top 2020 Democrats haven't committed to MSNBC climate forum MORE (D-Ohio); former Rep. John DelaneyJohn Kevin DelaneyWilliamson: Climate change result of an 'amoral' economic system The Hill Interview: Sanford says Trump GOP doing 'serious brand destruction' Krystal Ball: Reality debunks Biden's 'Medicare for all' smear MORE (D-Md.); New York City Mayor Bill de BlasioBill de BlasioPatagonia says to shut stores for a few hours during Global Climate Strike Nearly 60 US mayors pen op-ed backing Buttigieg's 2020 bid Gabbard drives coverage in push to qualify for October debate MORE; bestselling author Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonOvernight Energy: Trump officials formally revoke California emissions waiver | EPA's Wheeler dodges questions about targeting San Francisco over homelessness | 2020 Dems duke it out at second climate forum Williamson: Climate change result of an 'amoral' economic system Overnight Energy: Top presidential candidates to skip second climate forum | Group sues for info on 'attempts to politicize' NOAA | Trump allows use of oil reserve after Saudi attacks MORE; former Rep. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.); and Miramar, Fla., Mayor Wayne MessamWayne Martin MessamPoll: Biden leads Democratic field by 10 points in Florida Nearly 60 US mayors pen op-ed backing Buttigieg's 2020 bid The Hill's 12:30 Report: House panel approves impeachment powers MORE.

The DNC will make a final determination on which candidates make the stage after a certification process.

Candidates who fell short for the September event could still qualify for the October debate, which will have the same criteria.

The qualifying window for both events opened on June 28, but a DNC memo sent to the campaigns earlier this month said that the deadline to qualify for the October debate will be two weeks before it begins.

That would give candidates more time to make the October stage, joining the 10 candidates who will appear in September, who will also qualify for the following debate.

Of the 10 candidates who are likely not to make the stage in September, Steyer is the closest to qualifying, needing only one more survey that meets the DNC threshold after meeting the donor criteria. Steyer has yet to make any of the debates after launching his presidential campaign shortly before the July debate.

Gabbard, who has also met the donor requirement, needs two more surveys. The Hawaii congresswoman made the stage in the previous two debates.

But missing out on the September debate could make it even harder to climb in the polls or attract new donors given that it will deprive candidates of a critical platform to pitch themselves to voters and an opportunity to distinguish themselves in a crowded primary field.

Harris, for example, shot up in the polls after she confronted Biden in June over his past opposition to school busing, while Booker saw his best day of fundraising of the 2020 cycle the day after the July debate. 

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandTwo years after Maria, Puerto Rico awaits disaster funds Defense bill talks set to start amid wall fight Democrats seize Senate floor to protest gun inaction: 'Put up or shut up' MORE (D-N.Y.) dropped out of the race just hours before the qualification deadline after failing to make much headway in the crowded field.

Some of the candidates who were on the verge of failing to make the cut have grumbled that the DNC’s requirements are too stringent or that the decisionmaking process behind them lacked transparency.

In a statement on Wednesday, hours before the deadline, Steyer's campaign sent a statement calling on the DNC to expand its "polling criteria in the future to include more early state qualifying polling."

Meanwhile, Gabbard’s campaign hammered the body last week over its process for selecting which pollsters will count toward the qualifying criteria.