10 Democrats set to debate after other half falls short

 10 Democrats set to debate after other half falls short
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Ten Democrats running for president are likely to have qualified for the primary debate next month after the Democratic National Committee’s (DNC) deadline to meet its criteria passed on Wednesday night.

That is half of the 20 Democrats who took part in the two previous debates after the DNC doubled the thresholds to make the stage. It will likely mean the debate will take over only one night, on Sept. 12. 

The previous two debates in June and July were spread over a total of four nights, as the DNC has capped the maximum number of candidates who can debate at once at 10.

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For the September debate, the DNC required each candidate to reach 130,000 unique donors and at least 2 percent support in four DNC-approved polls to qualify.

Ten candidates have met those requirements: Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump hails Arizona Senate for audit at Phoenix rally, slams governor Republicans focus tax hike opposition on capital gains change Biden on hecklers: 'This is not a Trump rally. Let 'em holler' MORE; Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersPoll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Overnight Defense: US launches another airstrike in Somalia | Amendment to expand Pentagon recusal period added to NDAA | No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia US launches second Somalia strike in week MORE (I-Vt.); Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenKavanaugh conspiracy? Demands to reopen investigation ignore both facts and the law Biden signals tough stance on tech with antitrust picks Poll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary MORE (D-Mass.); Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisKavanaugh conspiracy? Demands to reopen investigation ignore both facts and the law 'CON laws' limit the health care competition Biden aims to deliver JD Vance takes aim at culture wars, childless politicians MORE (D-Calif.); South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegJD Vance takes aim at culture wars, childless politicians Poll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary The Hill's Morning Report - High-profile COVID-19 infections spark new worries MORE; Sen. Cory BookerCory BookerKavanaugh conspiracy? Demands to reopen investigation ignore both facts and the law JD Vance takes aim at culture wars, childless politicians Poll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary MORE (D-N.J.); Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharBiden signals tough stance on tech with antitrust picks Hillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill to hold platforms accountable for misinformation during health crises | Website outages hit Olympics, Amazon and major banks Competition laws could be a death knell for startup mergers and acquisitions MORE (D-Minn.); former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas); former tech executive Andrew YangAndrew YangPoll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Kings launch voting rights effort honoring John Lewis Eric Adams to meet with Biden on curbing gun violence MORE; and former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro.

The 10 remaining candidates in the Democratic field appear likely to have failed to make the stage: billionaire hedge fund executive Tom SteyerTom SteyerOvernight Energy: 'Eye of fire,' Exxon lobbyist's comments fuel renewed attacks on oil industry | Celebrities push Biden to oppose controversial Minnesota pipeline | More than 75 companies ask Congress to pass clean electricity standard Celebrities push Biden to oppose controversial Minnesota pipeline Six things to watch as California heads for recall election MORE; Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardTulsi Gabbard on Chicago mayor's decision to limit media interviews to people of color: 'Anti-white racism' Fox News says network and anchor Leland Vittert have 'parted ways' New co-chairs named for congressional caucus for millennials MORE (D-Hawaii); Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetHow Sen. Graham can help fix the labor shortage with commonsense immigration reform For true American prosperity, make the child tax credit permanent Colorado lawmaker warns of fire season becoming year-round MORE (D-Colo.); Montana Gov. Steve BullockSteve Bullock65 former governors, mayors back bipartisan infrastructure deal Arkansas, New Jersey governors to head National Governors Association Biden 'allies' painting him into a corner MORE; Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanSix takeaways: What the FEC reports tell us about the midterm elections Schumer, Tim Scott lead as Senate fundraising pace heats up Here's what Congress is reading at the beach this summer MORE (D-Ohio); former Rep. John DelaneyJohn DelaneyDirect air capture is a crucial bipartisan climate policy Lobbying world Coronavirus Report: The Hill's Steve Clemons interviews Rep. Rodney Davis MORE (D-Md.); New York City Mayor Bill de BlasioBill de BlasioNYC George Floyd statue to be relocated after vandalism On The Money: Yellen to Congress: Raise the debt ceiling or risk 'irreparable harm' | Frustration builds as infrastructure talks drag De Blasio urges NYC businesses to require coronavirus vaccines MORE; bestselling author Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonMarianne Williamson calls on Biden to drop efforts to extradite Assange Susan Sarandon and Marianne Williamson call for justice in Steven Donziger case Marianne Williamson: Refusal to hike minimum wage is part of 'rigged economy' MORE; former Rep. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.); and Miramar, Fla., Mayor Wayne MessamWayne Martin MessamKey moments in the 2020 Democratic presidential race so far Wayne Messam suspends Democratic presidential campaign 2020 primary debate guide: Everything you need to know ahead of the November forum MORE.

The DNC will make a final determination on which candidates make the stage after a certification process.

Candidates who fell short for the September event could still qualify for the October debate, which will have the same criteria.

The qualifying window for both events opened on June 28, but a DNC memo sent to the campaigns earlier this month said that the deadline to qualify for the October debate will be two weeks before it begins.

That would give candidates more time to make the October stage, joining the 10 candidates who will appear in September, who will also qualify for the following debate.

Of the 10 candidates who are likely not to make the stage in September, Steyer is the closest to qualifying, needing only one more survey that meets the DNC threshold after meeting the donor criteria. Steyer has yet to make any of the debates after launching his presidential campaign shortly before the July debate.

Gabbard, who has also met the donor requirement, needs two more surveys. The Hawaii congresswoman made the stage in the previous two debates.

But missing out on the September debate could make it even harder to climb in the polls or attract new donors given that it will deprive candidates of a critical platform to pitch themselves to voters and an opportunity to distinguish themselves in a crowded primary field.

Harris, for example, shot up in the polls after she confronted Biden in June over his past opposition to school busing, while Booker saw his best day of fundraising of the 2020 cycle the day after the July debate. 

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandEquilibrium/ Sustainability — Presented by NextEra Energy — Clean power repurposes dirty power Senators hail 'historic changes' as competing proposals to tackle military sexual assault advance Overnight Defense: Military justice overhaul included in defense bill | Pentagon watchdog to review security of 'nuclear football' | Pentagon carries out first air strike in Somalia under Biden MORE (D-N.Y.) dropped out of the race just hours before the qualification deadline after failing to make much headway in the crowded field.

Some of the candidates who were on the verge of failing to make the cut have grumbled that the DNC’s requirements are too stringent or that the decisionmaking process behind them lacked transparency.

In a statement on Wednesday, hours before the deadline, Steyer's campaign sent a statement calling on the DNC to expand its "polling criteria in the future to include more early state qualifying polling."

Meanwhile, Gabbard’s campaign hammered the body last week over its process for selecting which pollsters will count toward the qualifying criteria.