Yang says he would not run as a third-party candidate

Yang says he would not run as a third-party candidate
© Aaron Schwartz

Democratic presidential candidate Andrew YangAndrew YangKrystal Ball calls on Sanders to follow Yang's lead on war on drugs Overnight Energy: Trump officials formally revoke California emissions waiver | EPA's Wheeler dodges questions about targeting San Francisco over homelessness | 2020 Dems duke it out at second climate forum Again, DNC debate moderators fail to ask about democracy issues MORE, a former tech executive, said on Thursday that he would not mount a third-party bid for the White House if he doesn’t win his party’s nomination, arguing it would “increase the odds” of President TrumpDonald John TrumpMarine unit in Florida reportedly pushing to hold annual ball at Trump property Giuliani clashes with CNN's Cuomo, calls him a 'sellout' and the 'enemy' Giuliani says 'of course' he asked Ukraine to look into Biden seconds after denying it MORE winning a second term in office.

“My job is to help get Donald Trump out of office, and I would do nothing to increase the odds of him sticking around,” Yang told "CBS This Morning" in an interview. “And I think a third-party candidacy would do just that.”

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Yang entered the Democratic presidential contest last year as a virtual unknown in politics. He faces steep odds of winning the party’s nomination — his poll numbers are consistently in the low single digits and he ended the second quarter of 2019 among the candidates with the least cash on hand.

More recently, however, he has outperformed several of his better-known — and more politically experienced — rivals, including Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandTwo years after Maria, Puerto Rico awaits disaster funds Defense bill talks set to start amid wall fight Democrats seize Senate floor to protest gun inaction: 'Put up or shut up' MORE (D-N.Y.), former Colorado Gov. John HickenlooperJohn HickenlooperLeft off debate stage, Bullock all-in on Iowa Yang says he would not run as a third-party candidate The Hill's Morning Report - Hurricane Dorian devastates the Bahamas, creeps along Florida coast MORE and Washington Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeOvernight Energy: Trump officials formally revoke California emissions waiver | EPA's Wheeler dodges questions about targeting San Francisco over homelessness | 2020 Dems duke it out at second climate forum Yang floats nominating Inslee as 'climate czar' The Hill's Campaign Report: Democrats clash over future of party in heated debate MORE, who have dropped out of the presidential race in recent weeks.

Yang has also won the right to appear in the third Democratic presidential debate on Sept. 10. Unlike the first two debates, which featured 20 candidates each, the September debate will include only 10 candidates, a result of tougher qualifying measures.

Yang isn’t the only candidate to rule out a possible third-party campaign for the White House. Another long-shot presidential hopeful, Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardKavanaugh book author on impeachment calls: 'That's not our determination to make' Trump's 'soldier of fortune' foreign policy Beto needs to revive talk about his 'war tax' proposal MORE (D-Hawaii), said last week that a third-party bid was out of the question, even if she doesn’t win the Democratic nomination.

“I’ve ruled that out,” Gabbard said in an interview with CNN. “I’m going to continue to focus on moving our campaign forward, continuing this grassroots campaign, continuing to deliver our message to the American people.”