California poll: Biden, Sanders lead Democratic field; Harris takes fifth

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenDonald Trump Jr. to self-publish book 'Liberal Privilege' before GOP convention Tom Price: Here's how we can obtain more affordable care The Memo: Democrats feel rising tide in Florida MORE and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden wins Louisiana primary Oh, Canada: Should the US emulate Canada's National Health Service? Trump glosses over virus surge during Florida trip MORE (I-Vt.) are tied for first place among Democratic primary voters in California, while home-state Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHillicon Valley: Facebook considers political ad ban | Senators raise concerns over civil rights audit | Amazon reverses on telling workers to delete TikTok Senators raise concerns over Facebook's civil rights audit Biden's marijuana plan is out of step with public opinion MORE (D) is running in a distant fifth, according to a new poll.

The Emerson University survey released Tuesday shows Biden and Sanders leading the pack in California with 26 percent support each, followed by Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenTrump defends Roger Stone move: He was target of 'Witch Hunt' Democrats blast Trump for commuting Roger Stone: 'The most corrupt president in history' Pharma pricing is a problem, but antitrust isn't the (only) solution MORE (D-Mass.) at 20 percent. No other candidate secures double-digit support in the poll.

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Tech entrepreneur and political newcomer Andrew YangAndrew YangBiden campaign to take over 'Supernatural' star's Instagram for interview Hillicon Valley: Justice Department announces superseding indictment against WikiLeaks' Assange | Facebook ad boycott gains momentum | FBI sees spike in coronavirus-related cyber threats | Boston city government bans facial recognition technology The Hill's Campaign Report: Progressives feel momentum after primary night MORE notches 7 percent support in the survey, with Harris following at 6 percent support.

Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas) and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegBiden campaign hires top cybersecurity officials to defend against threats Biden strikes populist tone in blistering rebuke of Trump, Wall Street Buttigieg's new book, 'Trust,' slated for October release MORE (D) took sixth and seventh place in the poll with 5 percent and 4 percent support, respectively.

The survey is a sign that Harris may face a difficult battle in her home state’s nominating contest, a delegate-rich election that carries more significance than ever because of an accelerated primary schedule that places it on Super Tuesday, when voters in a dozen states will cast their ballots for the Democratic nomination.

“Senator Kamala Harris is in trouble in her home state. If she is unable to gain momentum in Iowa or New Hampshire, come Super Tuesday she might have a similar fate to Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioGOP chairman vows to protect whistleblowers following Vindman retirement over 'bullying' Lincoln Project offers list of GOP senators who 'protect' Trump in new ad GOP Miami mayor does not commit to voting for Trump MORE in 2016, when he was unable to win his home state of Florida and dropped out of the race,” Emerson Polling Director Spencer Kimball said, referring to Rubio’s 2016 loss to President TrumpDonald John TrumpDeSantis on Florida schools reopening: 'If you can do Walmart,' then 'we absolutely can do schools' NYT editorial board calls for the reopening of schools with help from federal government's 'checkbook' Mueller pens WaPo op-ed: Roger Stone 'remains a convicted felon, and rightly so' MORE in Florida’s Republican presidential primary.

In fact, no recent presidential candidate who lost his or her home state in a primary has gone on to win their party’s nomination.

Sanders’s support in the Golden State is driven primarily by voters under the age of 50. Among those voters, the Vermont senator carries 34 percent support, according to the Emerson poll. Warren takes 18 percent among that group, while Biden trails with 16 percent.

But Biden enjoys strong support with older voters. Among those over the age of 50, the former vice president notched 40 percent support. Warren received 23 percent among that group, while Sanders scored 13 percent. 

While the poll shows Warren running in third place in California, it also suggests that her support may be shakier than her fellow top-tier candidates in the state.

Only 31 percent of respondents who picked Warren as their first choice said they would definitely vote for her in the primary. Among those that said they would support Sanders or Biden, 67 and 59 percent respectively said that they would stick with their candidate of choice.

The Emerson poll surveyed 424 registered Democratic voters in California from Sept. 13 to 16. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.7 percentage points.