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California poll: Biden, Sanders lead Democratic field; Harris takes fifth

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump State Department appointee arrested in connection with Capitol riot FireEye finds evidence Chinese hackers exploited Microsoft email app flaw since January Biden officials to travel to border amid influx of young migrants MORE and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersABC names new deputy political director, weekend White House correspondent Ron Johnson forces reading of 628-page Senate coronavirus relief bill on floor GOP pulling out all the stops to delay COVID-19 package MORE (I-Vt.) are tied for first place among Democratic primary voters in California, while home-state Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Harris Harris speaks with Netanyahu amid ICC probe Senate votes to take up COVID-19 relief bill Why is Joe Biden dodging the public and the press? MORE (D) is running in a distant fifth, according to a new poll.

The Emerson University survey released Tuesday shows Biden and Sanders leading the pack in California with 26 percent support each, followed by Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenPhilly city council calls on Biden to 'cancel all student loan debt' in first 100 days Hillicon Valley: High alert as new QAnon date approaches Thursday | Biden signals another reversal from Trump with national security guidance | Parler files a new case Senators question Bezos, Amazon about cameras placed in delivery vans MORE (D-Mass.) at 20 percent. No other candidate secures double-digit support in the poll.

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Tech entrepreneur and political newcomer Andrew YangAndrew YangDozens of famous men support ,400 monthly payments for mothers for 'unpaid labor at home' Yang intervenes after man threatened with metal pole on Staten Island Ferry NYC's largest union endorses Maya Wiley in mayoral race MORE notches 7 percent support in the survey, with Harris following at 6 percent support.

Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas) and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by ExxonMobil - Increased security on Capitol Hill amid QAnon's March 4 date Biden to meet with bipartisan lawmakers on infrastructure The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Lawmakers face Capitol threat as senators line up votes for relief bill MORE (D) took sixth and seventh place in the poll with 5 percent and 4 percent support, respectively.

The survey is a sign that Harris may face a difficult battle in her home state’s nominating contest, a delegate-rich election that carries more significance than ever because of an accelerated primary schedule that places it on Super Tuesday, when voters in a dozen states will cast their ballots for the Democratic nomination.

“Senator Kamala Harris is in trouble in her home state. If she is unable to gain momentum in Iowa or New Hampshire, come Super Tuesday she might have a similar fate to Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioHillicon Valley: YouTube to restore Trump's account | House-passed election bill takes aim at foreign interference | Senators introduce legislation to create international tech partnerships Senators introduce bill creating technology partnerships to compete with China DeSantis's rising GOP profile fuels 2024 talk MORE in 2016, when he was unable to win his home state of Florida and dropped out of the race,” Emerson Polling Director Spencer Kimball said, referring to Rubio’s 2016 loss to President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump State Department appointee arrested in connection with Capitol riot Intelligence community investigating links between lawmakers, Capitol rioters Michelle Obama slams 'partisan actions' to 'curtail access to ballot box' MORE in Florida’s Republican presidential primary.

In fact, no recent presidential candidate who lost his or her home state in a primary has gone on to win their party’s nomination.

Sanders’s support in the Golden State is driven primarily by voters under the age of 50. Among those voters, the Vermont senator carries 34 percent support, according to the Emerson poll. Warren takes 18 percent among that group, while Biden trails with 16 percent.

But Biden enjoys strong support with older voters. Among those over the age of 50, the former vice president notched 40 percent support. Warren received 23 percent among that group, while Sanders scored 13 percent. 

While the poll shows Warren running in third place in California, it also suggests that her support may be shakier than her fellow top-tier candidates in the state.

Only 31 percent of respondents who picked Warren as their first choice said they would definitely vote for her in the primary. Among those that said they would support Sanders or Biden, 67 and 59 percent respectively said that they would stick with their candidate of choice.

The Emerson poll surveyed 424 registered Democratic voters in California from Sept. 13 to 16. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.7 percentage points.