Bennet launches first TV ads in Iowa

White House hopeful Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetYang: 2020 rivals in Senate should be able to campaign amid impeachment Trump trade deal likely to sow division in Democratic presidential field Schumer to colleagues running for White House: Impeachment comes first MORE (D-Colo.) on Tuesday launched his first two television ads in Iowa as he tries to gain traction in the critical caucus state. 

The ads, titled “Most” and “Truth,” seek to cast Bennet as a pragmatist “tackling tough problems” and underscore his plan to institute a public health care option while allowing Americans to keep their private insurance plan if they choose. 

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“The truth is, a health care plan that starts by kicking people off their coverage makes no sense. We all know it,” Bennet, a vocal centrist, says. “Before we go and blow up everything, let’s try this: give families a choice, keep your health care or join a public option. It’s that simple, and it’s the fastest way to cover everybody.” 

Health care has emerged as a chief fault line in the Democratic presidential primary, with Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSaagar Enjeti says Buttigieg's release of McKinsey client list shows he 'caved to public pressure' Sanders endorses Young Turks founder Cenk Uygur for Katie Hill's former House seat Biden hires Clinton, O'Rourke alum as campaign's digital director MORE (I-Vt.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenSaagar Enjeti says Buttigieg's release of McKinsey client list shows he 'caved to public pressure' On The Money: Lawmakers strike spending deal | US, China reach limited trade deal ahead of tariff deadline | Lighthizer fails to quell GOP angst over new NAFTA Bill Weld: As many as six GOP senators privately support convicting Trump MORE (D-Mass.) calling for a single-payer policy that would scrap private plans while the rest of the field debates different proposals that would institute a public option and allow private coverage to continue.

Bennet’s campaign said Tuesday’s ads are part of a seven-figure TV and digital ad buy will run over the course of several weeks. A third ad will also be unveiled during that time.

“Everywhere Michael goes on the campaign trail, people walk away believing he is the leader we need to make change, but not enough people have had the chance to meet him or learn what drives him,” said Bennet campaign spokeswoman Shannon Beckham. 

“These ads show who Michael is and how he’s different from other candidates. He’s pounding truth into a campaign full of empty promises and broken politics — calling for a new generation of leadership and a health care solution that doesn’t take insurance away from millions of Americans.” 

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenSenate gears up for battle over witnesses in impeachment trial Conservative group hits White House with billboard ads: 'What is Trump hiding?' Democrat representing Pennsylvania district Trump carried plans to vote to impeach  MORE, entrepreneur Tom SteyerThomas (Tom) Fahr SteyerKrystal Ball: Influx of billionaire cash in 2020 contest is 'deeply corrosive' to 'civil society' Booker says he will not make December debate stage Democrats set early state primary debates for 2020 MORE and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegSaagar Enjeti says Buttigieg's release of McKinsey client list shows he 'caved to public pressure' Biden hires Clinton, O'Rourke alum as campaign's digital director Trump neck and neck with top 2020 Democrats in Wisconsin: poll MORE, three other Democratic White House contenders, are also currently airing ads in Iowa. Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisOvernight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — House passes sweeping Pelosi bill to lower drug prices | Senate confirms Trump FDA pick | Trump officials approve Medicaid work requirements in South Carolina Sanders endorses Young Turks founder Cenk Uygur for Katie Hill's former House seat Kamala Harris dropped out, but let's keep her mental health plan alive MORE (D-Calif.) and former Rep. John DelaneyJohn Kevin DelaneyThe great AI debate: What candidates are (finally) saying about artificial intelligence Delaney to DNC: Open second debate stage for candidates who qualified for past events Krystal Ball: What Harris's exit means for the other 2020 candidates MORE (D-Md.) have previously aired TV ads in the Hawkeye State, which will hold the first nominating contest of the 2020 cycle.

Bennet, who failed to qualify for this month’s primary debate, has struggled to gin up support for his long-shot presidential bid since its May launch, stagnating near the bottom of national and statewide polling. However, his campaign has said his late entry into the primary and allegedly unfair debate thresholds set by the Democratic National Committee (DNC) have stymied his campaign.

“Caucus-goers will decide who our nominee is, not the DNC,” Beckham said in a statement to Politico. “Unlike some of his colleagues, Michael is not just laundering money to Facebook to spend $70 for every $1 donation.”