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DNC raises qualifying thresholds for fifth presidential debate

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) on Monday announced new criteria to qualify for the fifth presidential primary debate, raising the bar for candidates hoping to make the stage in November.

In order to qualify for the fifth debate, candidates will have to amass support from at least 165,000 unique donors, including a minimum of 600 donors per state in at least 20 states.

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They’ll also have to register at least 3 percent in four or more qualifying polls or 5 percent in two single-state polls in Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina or Nevada. To count towards the debate criteria, those polls will have to be released between Sept. 13 and a week before the debate.

The DNC has steadily imposed steeper requirements to qualify for its presidential debates. The past two debates required candidates to collect contributions from 130,000 unique donors and notch at least 2 percent in four qualifying polls, doubling the criteria compared to the initial two debates.

But the new requirements unveiled on Monday aren’t as austere as some candidates had predicted. Many campaigns warned in recent weeks that the DNC would likely double the existing donor threshold, suggesting that candidates could be required to collect contributions from as many as 260,000 donors.

The new criteria are reflective of the fine line the DNC has sought to walk throughout its presidential nominating contest.

On one hand, the committee has been tasked with overseeing a historically crowded and diverse field of candidates jockeying for the Democratic nomination. But DNC officials have also sought to head off accusations that they are trying to winnow down the number of candidates before voters have a chance to weigh in. Currently, 19 candidates are running for the Democratic nomination.

Already, a handful of candidates have dropped out of the presidential race after struggling to make the debates. 

Washington Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeBeyond California, a record year for recalls Seattle is first major US city to see 70 percent of residents fully vaccinated, mayor says Rivers, hydropower and climate resilience MORE, former Colorado Gov. John HickenlooperJohn HickenlooperEx-Sen. Cory Gardner joins lobbying firm 'Killibuster': Democratic angst grows as filibuster threatens agenda Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting MORE and Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandOvernight Defense: Joint Chiefs chairman clashes with GOP on critical race theory | House bill introduced to overhaul military justice system as sexual assault reform builds momentum House lawmakers introduce bill to overhaul military justice system Pentagon chief backs change to military sexual assault prosecution MORE (D-N.Y.) ended their campaigns after it became clear that they would miss the fall debates. New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio dropped out of the race last week for the same reason.

Perhaps the most significant change in the new criteria is that candidates now have two ways of meeting the DNC’s polling requirement. They can either register 3 percent in four national or state polls, or they can hit 5 percent in at least two single-state polls from one of the early primary and caucus states.

A handful of candidates already appear to have met the new donor threshold, including former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenSchumer vows to advance two-pronged infrastructure plan next month Biden appoints veteran housing, banking regulator as acting FHFA chief Iran claims U.S. to lift all oil sanctions but State Department says 'nothing is agreed' MORE, Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenSchumer vows to advance two-pronged infrastructure plan next month Overnight Health Care: CDC panel meets on vaccines and heart inflammation | Health officials emphasize vaccine is safe | Judge rules Missouri doesn't have to implement Medicaid expansion Democrats urge Biden to extend moratorium on student loan payments MORE (D-Mass.), Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSenators say White House aides agreed to infrastructure 'framework' Briahna Joy Gray: Biden is keeping the filibuster to have 'a Joe Manchin presidency' On The Money: Biden to fire FHFA director after Supreme Court removes restriction | Yellen pleads with Congress to raise debt ceiling MORE (I-Vt.), Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisRick Scott blocks Senate vote on top cyber nominee until Harris visits border Head of Border Patrol resigning from post Migrant children face alarming conditions in US shelter: BBC investigation MORE (D-Calif.) and South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegHigh-speed rail getting last minute push in Congress Buttigieg: Bipartisan deal on infrastructure 'strongly preferred' OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden ends infrastructure talks with key Republican | Colonial Pipeline CEO grilled over ransomware attack | Texas gov signs bills to improve power grid after winter storm MORE.

Only three qualifying polls have been released since Sept. 13, meaning that no candidate has met both criteria yet.

But the new requirements are likely to pose challenges for several candidates, who haven’t yet met the lower benchmarks for the fourth presidential debate in October.

In recent weeks, several candidates have pointed to the DNC’s anticipated decision to raise the qualifying thresholds as part of their fundraising pleas. Within minutes of the new criteria being announced, Sen. Cory BookerCory BookerThousands sent to emergency rooms every year due to violent police encounters: investigation Democrats fear they are running out of time on Biden agenda Harris casts tiebreaking vote to confirm OPM nominee MORE (D-N.J.) seized on the news in a fundraising email to supporters. 

“This new 165,000 donor threshold underscores the reason we’re being radically transparent with you,” Booker wrote. “The bar in this race has gotten higher and it will continue to. It’s not just the DNC threshold – our campaign needs to scale up to have a chance to stay in this race and compete to win the nomination.”

-- Updated at 3:47 p.m.