DNC raises qualifying thresholds for fifth presidential debate

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) on Monday announced new criteria to qualify for the fifth presidential primary debate, raising the bar for candidates hoping to make the stage in November.

In order to qualify for the fifth debate, candidates will have to amass support from at least 165,000 unique donors, including a minimum of 600 donors per state in at least 20 states.

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They’ll also have to register at least 3 percent in four or more qualifying polls or 5 percent in two single-state polls in Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina or Nevada. To count towards the debate criteria, those polls will have to be released between Sept. 13 and a week before the debate.

The DNC has steadily imposed steeper requirements to qualify for its presidential debates. The past two debates required candidates to collect contributions from 130,000 unique donors and notch at least 2 percent in four qualifying polls, doubling the criteria compared to the initial two debates.

But the new requirements unveiled on Monday aren’t as austere as some candidates had predicted. Many campaigns warned in recent weeks that the DNC would likely double the existing donor threshold, suggesting that candidates could be required to collect contributions from as many as 260,000 donors.

The new criteria are reflective of the fine line the DNC has sought to walk throughout its presidential nominating contest.

On one hand, the committee has been tasked with overseeing a historically crowded and diverse field of candidates jockeying for the Democratic nomination. But DNC officials have also sought to head off accusations that they are trying to winnow down the number of candidates before voters have a chance to weigh in. Currently, 19 candidates are running for the Democratic nomination.

Already, a handful of candidates have dropped out of the presidential race after struggling to make the debates. 

Washington Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeBloomberg, Steyer focus on climate change in effort to stand out Our government and public institutions must protect us against the unvaccinated Key moments in the 2020 Democratic presidential race so far MORE, former Colorado Gov. John HickenlooperJohn HickenlooperGOP leader warns lawmakers on fundraising: 'Getting our ass kicked' For a healthy aging workforce policy, look to Colorado Mitch McConnell may win the impeachment and lose the Senate MORE and Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandIt's time for paid leave for all GOP-Biden feud looms over impeachment trial Sanders defends vote against USMCA: 'Not a single damn mention' of climate change MORE (D-N.Y.) ended their campaigns after it became clear that they would miss the fall debates. New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio dropped out of the race last week for the same reason.

Perhaps the most significant change in the new criteria is that candidates now have two ways of meeting the DNC’s polling requirement. They can either register 3 percent in four national or state polls, or they can hit 5 percent in at least two single-state polls from one of the early primary and caucus states.

A handful of candidates already appear to have met the new donor threshold, including former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenPerry delegation talking points stressed pushing Ukraine to deal with 'corruption' GOP senator airs anti-Biden ad in Iowa amid impeachment trial Biden photobombs live national news broadcast at one of his rallies MORE, Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenBiden on whether Sanders can unify party as nominee: 'It depends' Overnight Health Care — Presented by Philip Morris International — HHS has no plans to declare emergency over coronavirus | GOP senator calls for travel ban to stop outbreak | Warren releases plan to contain infectious diseases Biden lines up high-profile surrogates to campaign in Iowa MORE (D-Mass.), Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersNew campaign ad goes after Sanders by mentioning heart attack Biden on whether Sanders can unify party as nominee: 'It depends' Steyer rebukes Biden for arguing with supporter he thought was Sanders voter MORE (I-Vt.), Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisSanders allies in new uproar over DNC convention appointments Biden leads 2020 pack in congressional endorsements Harris on 2020 endorsement: 'I am not thinking about it right now' MORE (D-Calif.) and South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegBiden on whether Sanders can unify party as nominee: 'It depends' Biden lines up high-profile surrogates to campaign in Iowa Hill.TV's Krystal Ball: Failure to embrace Sanders as nominee would 'destroy' Democratic Party MORE.

Only three qualifying polls have been released since Sept. 13, meaning that no candidate has met both criteria yet.

But the new requirements are likely to pose challenges for several candidates, who haven’t yet met the lower benchmarks for the fourth presidential debate in October.

In recent weeks, several candidates have pointed to the DNC’s anticipated decision to raise the qualifying thresholds as part of their fundraising pleas. Within minutes of the new criteria being announced, Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerOvernight Defense: White House threatens to veto House Iran bills | Dems 'frustrated' after Iran briefing | Lawmakers warn US, UK intel sharing at risk after Huawei decision White House Correspondents' Association blasts State for 'punitive action' against NPR Senate Democrat demands State Department reinstate NPR reporter on Pompeo trip MORE (D-N.J.) seized on the news in a fundraising email to supporters. 

“This new 165,000 donor threshold underscores the reason we’re being radically transparent with you,” Booker wrote. “The bar in this race has gotten higher and it will continue to. It’s not just the DNC threshold – our campaign needs to scale up to have a chance to stay in this race and compete to win the nomination.”

-- Updated at 3:47 p.m.