Democratic debate in October to be held over only one night

Democratic debate in October to be held over only one night
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The October Democratic debate will take place over only one night even as 12 candidates have qualified so far.

The first two debates had both been spread out over two nights after the Democratic National Committee (DNC) decided to cap the number of candidates onstage at 10 per night.

But the last debate this month took place over one night, after only 10 candidates qualified because of toughened criteria.

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So far, 12 candidates have qualified for the debate on Oct. 15, most recently Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardBloomberg, Sanders, Biden beat Trump in head-to-heads in North Carolina: poll Sanders takes lead in new Hill/HarrisX poll The Hill's Campaign Report: Bloomberg to face off with rivals at Nevada debate MORE (D-Hawaii).

"To address several inquiries we have received we are writing to let you know that, pending a final decision after the certification deadline, it is the intention of the DNC and our media partners to hold the October debate over one night on Tuesday October 15th," DNC said in an email, the DNC told campaigns in an email, according to a committee spokesperson.

A DNC official told The Hill in an email that the event will take place on one night because the organization's goal is to expand its viewership. The committee also believes the one-night debate worked well in September.

The event will be hosted by CNN and The New York Times. 

The 12 candidates who have qualified are: former Vice President Joe BidenJoe Biden'Where's your spoon?' What we didn't learn in the latest debate Sanders nabs endorsement from Congressional Hispanic Caucus member Poll: Sanders holds 7-point lead in crucial California primary MORE, Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDemocratic senators ask DOJ watchdog to expand Giuliani probe CNN signs Andrew Yang as contributor Bloomberg qualifies for South Carolina primary debate MORE (D-N.J.), South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegChasten Buttigieg: 'I've been dealing with the likes of Rush Limbaugh my entire life' San Diego Union-Tribune endorses Buttigieg 'Where's your spoon?' What we didn't learn in the latest debate MORE (D), former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro, Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi Harris5 takeaways from Las Vegas debate California lawmakers mark Day of Remembrance for Japanese internment Democratic senators ask DOJ watchdog to expand Giuliani probe MORE (D-Calif.), Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharWarren declines to disavow super PAC that supports her San Diego Union-Tribune endorses Buttigieg 'Where's your spoon?' What we didn't learn in the latest debate MORE (D-Minn.), former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeCNN signs Andrew Yang as contributor Krystal Ball: Voters are coming to their own judgements about who is electable Warren campaign to host series of events in Texas MORE (D-Texas), Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersNevada Democratic debate draws record-breaking 19.7 million viewers 'Where's your spoon?' What we didn't learn in the latest debate Ocasio-Cortez defends Warren against 'misogynist trope' MORE (I-Vt.), hedge fund manager Tom SteyerTom Fahr SteyerKlobuchar rolls out ads in Super Tuesday states Poll: Democrats trail Trump in Wisconsin, lead in Michigan and Pennsylvania Bloomberg, Sanders, Biden beat Trump in head-to-heads in North Carolina: poll MORE, Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenWarren declines to disavow super PAC that supports her San Diego Union-Tribune endorses Buttigieg 'Where's your spoon?' What we didn't learn in the latest debate MORE (D-Mass.), Andrew YangAndrew YangThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Roger Stone gets over three years in prison; Brutal night for Bloomberg Analysis: Democratic presidential campaigns score high on cybersecurity The Hill's Campaign Report: Bloomberg in the spotlight for Nevada debate MORE and Gabbard.

So far no other candidate is believed to be close to meeting the criteria for the October debate, which consists of garnering at least 130,000 unique donors and at least 2 percent support in four DNC-recognized polls.

-- Updated at 12:16 p.m.