Democratic lawmaker fires back after NRCC mocks him for getting marriage counseling

Rep. Joe CunninghamJoseph CunninghamDemocrat says he expects to oppose articles of impeachment against Trump Conservative group unveils million ad campaign against Trump impeachment Club for Growth extends advertising against House Dems over impeachment MORE (D-S.C.) on Friday fired back after House Republicans’ campaign arm mocked him and his wife over their marriage counseling, saying the group should give respecting women "a try." 

The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) had the day before highlighted a post from Cunningham's wife, criticizing her for praising pro-impeachment comments.

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Amanda Cunningham posted on social media this week praising former Rep. Beto O’Rourke’s (D-Texas) attacks on President TrumpDonald John TrumpRepublicans consider skipping witnesses in Trump impeachment trial Bombshell Afghanistan report bolsters calls for end to 'forever wars' Lawmakers dismiss Chinese retaliatory threat to US tech MORE amid an impeachment inquiry stemming from a whistleblower complaint.

Joe Cunningham is one of just a few remaining House Democrats who have not publicly supported impeaching the president. 

“Beto getting bolder and I like it,” Amanda Cunningham wrote on Instagram.

The NRCC took a screenshot of her post and tweeted it out.

“Looks like Mrs. Cunningham likes a man who supports baseless impeachment … wonder if this will come up in @RepCunningham‘s marriage counseling?” it asked.

“Amanda is my rock - and the @NRCC just hit rock bottom. I respect my wife and all women, y’all should give it a try,” Joe Cunningham wrote on Twitter along with a fundraising link.

The NRCC's post was criticized by many social media users, including John Weaver, a lead GOP strategist on former Ohio Gov. John Kasich's 2016 presidential campaign.

NRCC spokesman Chris Pack responded:

Amanda Cunningham opened up about the couple’s therapy sessions earlier this month in a video talking about her dissatisfaction with the health care coverage provided to members of Congress, The Post and Courier reported.

She said her therapy sessions, as well as their marriage counseling, were denied under the taxpayer-funded plan.

“It’s just mind-blowing to me,” she said, “that these basic, well-known needs, that mental health is health care, are still being denied. That we’re still fighting for these absolutely basic things.”

She continued, “So I’m reaching out to my congressman — yes, also my husband — but saying, like, hey, what can we do about this? Like, let’s go to the House floor, let’s write a bill, let’s, I don’t know what you do, but let’s do it because this is ridiculous.”

Cunningham’s spokeswoman Rebecca Drago told the local outlet that the congressman is not planning to offer legislation to change Congress’s health care coverage, adding that he does not support having taxpayer-subsidized health plans cover the issues his wife touched on.

“Joe and Amanda are grateful to have great health care for themselves and their son Boone,” she said. “They agree with the majority of South Carolinians that private insurers should offer more comprehensive coverage, including more coverage for mental health, and they understand the deep frustration that many folks have with their insurance, including unexpected and surprise billing.”

Cunningham, a former ocean engineer turned lawyer, defeated GOP state Rep. Katie Arrington during the 2018 midterms and flipped South Carolina’s 1st District to blue for the first time in decades.