12 candidates qualify for October Democratic debate

12 candidates qualify for October Democratic debate
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Twelve candidates will share the stage during the fourth Democratic presidential debate this month, the Democratic National Committee (DNC) announced on Wednesday, making it the most crowded single-night debate to date. 

To qualify for the debate, the candidates had to amass the support of 130,000 unique donors and register at least 2 percent in four DNC-approved polls by Oct. 1. The debate is set to take place on Oct. 15 at Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio, just north of Columbus.

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The 12 candidates to make the cut are: former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Airbnb - House to pass relief bill; Trump moves to get US back to work Democratic fears rise again as coronavirus pushes Biden to sidelines Sanders charges forward with 2020 bid despite long odds MORE; Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Airbnb - House to pass relief bill; Trump moves to get US back to work Oil price drop threatens US fracking boom Democratic fears rise again as coronavirus pushes Biden to sidelines MORE (I-Vt.); Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenDemocratic senators call on FDA to drop restrictions on blood donations from men who have sex with men HuffPost reporter: Coronavirus rescue package designed for 'super rich' Schumer: Senate should 'explore' remote voting if coronavirus sparks lengthy break MORE (D-Mass.); Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisDemocratic senators call on FDA to drop restrictions on blood donations from men who have sex with men Harris knocks Gaetz for taking issue with money for Howard in relief package Biden's general election strategy comes into focus MORE (D-Calif.); South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegReuters poll finds Sanders cutting Biden national lead to single digits Biden says he'll adopt plans from Sanders, Warren Buttigieg guest-hosts for Jimmy Kimmel: 'I've got nothing else going on' MORE; Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerLawmakers, labor leaders ramp up calls to use Defense Production Act Democratic senators call on FDA to drop restrictions on blood donations from men who have sex with men Amazon doubling overtime pay for warehouse workers MORE (D-N.J.); Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharDemocratic senators call on FDA to drop restrictions on blood donations from men who have sex with men Senate Democrats vow to keep pushing for more funds for mail-in voting Klobuchar says her husband has been released from hospital, 'recovering at home' MORE (D-Minn.); former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas); former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro; former tech executive Andrew YangAndrew YangSolving the coronavirus economic downturn — good psychology makes for good politics and policy Andrew Yang nonprofit to dole out checks to 500 households Senate GOP mulls forgivable loans to businesses to halt layoffs, bankruptcies MORE; billionaire philanthropist Tom SteyerTom SteyerProgressive advocates propose T 'green stimulus' plan Candidates want data privacy rules, except for their own campaigns Budowsky: Biden should pull together a 'dream team of rivals' MORE; and Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi Gabbard20 House Dems call on Trump to issue two-week, nationwide shelter-in-place order The Hill's Morning Report — ,000,000,000,000: GOP unveils historic US rescue effort Gillibrand endorses Biden for president MORE (D-Hawaii).

Biden and Warren will stand next to each other at center stage for the second debate in a row, according to CNN and The New York Times, the two media organizations hosting the fourth debate.

On Biden’s side of the stage will be Sanders, Harris, Booker, Steyer and Gabbard. Standing to Warren’s left will be Buttigieg, Yang, O’Rourke, Klobuchar and Castro. 

Unlike past debates, which limited the number of candidates onstage at once to 10, the fourth debate will feature all 12 qualifying candidates on a single night.

The DNC has imposed tougher qualifying criteria for the fifth debate, which is set for November. To make the cut, candidates will have to collect contributions from at least 165,000 unique donors and notch at least 3 percent in four approved polls or 5 percent in two approved early-state polls.