12 candidates qualify for October Democratic debate

12 candidates qualify for October Democratic debate
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Twelve candidates will share the stage during the fourth Democratic presidential debate this month, the Democratic National Committee (DNC) announced on Wednesday, making it the most crowded single-night debate to date. 

To qualify for the debate, the candidates had to amass the support of 130,000 unique donors and register at least 2 percent in four DNC-approved polls by Oct. 1. The debate is set to take place on Oct. 15 at Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio, just north of Columbus.

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The 12 candidates to make the cut are: former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenHouse Judiciary Committee formally receives impeachment report Democratic strategist: 'Medicare for All' exposes generational gap within party Yang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations MORE; Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersDemocratic strategist: 'Medicare for All' exposes generational gap within party Yang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations Biden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee MORE (I-Vt.); Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenArtist behind gold toilet offered to Trump sells banana duct-taped to a wall for 0,000 Democratic strategist: 'Medicare for All' exposes generational gap within party Yang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations MORE (D-Mass.); Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisYang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations Biden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee Delaney to DNC: Open second debate stage for candidates who qualified for past events MORE (D-Calif.); South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegDemocratic strategist: 'Medicare for All' exposes generational gap within party Yang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations Biden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee MORE; Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerBloomberg apologizes after critics say his calling Booker 'well spoken' was racist Biden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee Booker unveils legislation for federal bill to ban discrimination against natural hair MORE (D-N.J.); Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharBiden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee Delaney to DNC: Open second debate stage for candidates who qualified for past events There's a lot to like about the Senate privacy bill, if it's not watered down MORE (D-Minn.); former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas); former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro; former tech executive Andrew YangAndrew YangYang expands campaign with senior hires for digital operations Biden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee Delaney to DNC: Open second debate stage for candidates who qualified for past events MORE; billionaire philanthropist Tom SteyerThomas (Tom) Fahr SteyerBiden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee Delaney to DNC: Open second debate stage for candidates who qualified for past events The Hill's Campaign Report: Democrats worry about diversity on next debate stage MORE; and Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardBiden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee Delaney to DNC: Open second debate stage for candidates who qualified for past events The Hill's Campaign Report: Democrats worry about diversity on next debate stage MORE (D-Hawaii).

Biden and Warren will stand next to each other at center stage for the second debate in a row, according to CNN and The New York Times, the two media organizations hosting the fourth debate.

On Biden’s side of the stage will be Sanders, Harris, Booker, Steyer and Gabbard. Standing to Warren’s left will be Buttigieg, Yang, O’Rourke, Klobuchar and Castro. 

Unlike past debates, which limited the number of candidates onstage at once to 10, the fourth debate will feature all 12 qualifying candidates on a single night.

The DNC has imposed tougher qualifying criteria for the fifth debate, which is set for November. To make the cut, candidates will have to collect contributions from at least 165,000 unique donors and notch at least 3 percent in four approved polls or 5 percent in two approved early-state polls.