Former UN envoy Samantha Power doesn't rule out run for Warren's Senate seat

Former UN envoy Samantha Power doesn't rule out run for Warren's Senate seat
© Getty Images

Samantha PowerSamantha Jane PowerFormer US envoy Samantha Power: Trump finding 'new ways to compensate Putin for election interference' Former UN ambassador: Republicans have made a 'devil's bargain' to accept Trump Obama U.N. ambassador: Trump has 'endorsed ethnic cleansing' MORE, a former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, said on Friday that she would not rule out a possible run for Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenSaagar Enjeti says Buttigieg's release of McKinsey client list shows he 'caved to public pressure' On The Money: Lawmakers strike spending deal | US, China reach limited trade deal ahead of tariff deadline | Lighthizer fails to quell GOP angst over new NAFTA Bill Weld: As many as six GOP senators privately support convicting Trump MORE’s (D-Mass.) seat should Warren win the White House in 2020.

Asked during an event to promote her new memoir “The Education of an Idealist” whether a Senate run could be in her future, Power appeared to leave the door open. 

ADVERTISEMENT

“I don’t think it’s a good idea to rule anything out,” Power, who served as former President Obama’s U.N. envoy from 2013 until 2017, said at the Providence, R.I., event, The Boston Globe reported

It’s unclear how seriously Power is considering the possibility. She added that she “wouldn’t rule out managing the Red Sox” either.

Power said that she was still interested in public service, but insisted that she was currently focused on promoting her new book and spending time with her children. 

“I’m really, really focused on what I’m doing now,” Power said, according to the Globe. “And I have two small kids who I am making up for lost time with.”

Since leaving the Obama administration in 2017, Power has taught at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government and Harvard Law School, where Warren herself was once a professor.

Warren’s standing in the Democratic presidential primary contest has surged in recent months, with several recent national and early-state polls showing her pulling ahead of the field’s longtime front-runner, former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenSenate gears up for battle over witnesses in impeachment trial Conservative group hits White House with billboard ads: 'What is Trump hiding?' Democrat representing Pennsylvania district Trump carried plans to vote to impeach  MORE.

The Massachusetts senator announced on Friday that she raised $24.6 million in the third quarter of the year, putting her near the top of the pack in terms of fundraising. Only one other candidate, Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSaagar Enjeti says Buttigieg's release of McKinsey client list shows he 'caved to public pressure' Sanders endorses Young Turks founder Cenk Uygur for Katie Hill's former House seat Biden hires Clinton, O'Rourke alum as campaign's digital director MORE (I-Vt.), raised more than her in that time frame.