House Democratic campaign arm raises $27.4 million in third quarter

House Democratic campaign arm raises $27.4 million in third quarter
© Greg Nash

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) on Wednesday announced that it raked in $27.4 million in the third quarter as Democrats prepare to defend their House majority in 2020.

The committee said that $14 million of the total third-quarter fundraising haul came via small-dollar donations and that the average online donation was $16. 

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The 2019 third-quarter fundraising total is $6 million more than what the committee raised in the third quarter of 2017 before Democrats won control of the lower chamber in 2018, but just short of the $29 million the DCCC reported in the second quarter.

“Now more than ever, we must work to protect and expand our fragile House Majority," the committee's chairwoman, Rep. Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea BustosThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Pelosi accuses Trump of 'bribery' in Ukraine dealings DCCC adds senior staffers after summer departures DCCC raises more than M in October MORE (D-Ill.) said in a statement. "That means keeping up our record-setting pace, continuing our work to engage with a broad coalition of voters across this country, and fighting for the common sense priorities of the American people. The stakes have never been higher and we will not let up."

The latest fundraising numbers come after the committee experienced a summer shake-up and mass staff departure after some expressed concerns about diversity.

The committee named former EMILY’s List Executive Director Lucinda Guinn executive director last month. 

The fundraising haul also comes as House Democrats launch an impeachment inquiry into President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - House panel expected to approve impeachment articles Thursday Democrats worried by Jeremy Corbyn's UK rise amid anti-Semitism Warren, Buttigieg duke it out in sprint to 2020 MORE. House Democratic leadership was hesitant to announce the inquiry, in part, because of concerns about how it would play in 2020 congressional races. 

However, recent polls have shown the American public warming to the idea of an impeachment inquiry and the possible removal of Trump after Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - House panel expected to approve impeachment articles Thursday Democrats seek leverage for trial The Memo: Pelosi-Trump trade deal provokes debate on left MORE (D-Calif.) announced the beginning of an inquiry last month. 

Politico reported late last month that Bustos has encouraged vulnerable Democratic members to test a message focusing on their constitutional duties instead of Trump in their districts.