Dem lawmaker rips O'Rourke: 'I don't think losing is cool'

Dem lawmaker rips O'Rourke: 'I don't think losing is cool'
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Rep. Max RoseMax RoseRep. Bobby Rush endorses Bloomberg's White House bid Citizens United decision weathers 10 years of controversy Sanders, Warren battle for progressive endorsements MORE (D-N.Y.) sharply criticized former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeBiden calls for revoking key online legal protection Trump mocks Booker over suspended presidential campaign Julián Castro endorses Warren in 2020 race MORE (D-Texas) in an interview published Friday, accusing the former congressman of turning a losing Senate bid into social media stardom.

In an interview published in New York magazine's "Intelligencer," Rose lashed out at O'Rourke after the Texas Democrat criticized members of the party who do not support bold action on gun control and other issues. O'Rourke is a supporter of a federally mandated buyback of assault weapons.

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“I don’t think losing is cool. I want the Democratic Party to be the party of Kyrsten Sinema and not the party of Beto O’Rourke,” Rose said, referring to the first-term Arizona senator.

"Losing is not as cool as he thinks it is," the Staten Island congressman added to the magazine.

“When you win you get to help people, and when you lose you get to be a social-media rock star," Rose said. "So I don’t think Beto is cool, and I don’t think losing is cool. If we don’t win, we can’t do a f---ing thing for anybody in a union, anybody in public housing, anybody that can’t reunite with their family because of a f---ing racist Muslim ban."

Rose's comments are by far the sharpest public blowback to O'Rourke's pressure on Democrats to support a federally mandated assault weapons buyback, a position O'Rourke focused his campaign on after a deadly mass shooting in El Paso, his hometown, in August.

O'Rourke left Congress after losing a bid against Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSenate Republicans muscle through rules for Trump trial Cruz: White House not expected to push motion to dismiss impeachment articles Juan Williams: Counting the votes to remove Trump MORE (R-Texas) last year and subsequently announced a run for the presidency, though his campaign has failed to break into the top tier of contenders.

Rose, who represents a district won by President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate Republicans muscle through rules for Trump trial Collins breaks with GOP on attempt to change impeachment rules resolution Roberts admonishes House managers, Trump lawyers after heated exchange MORE in 2016, came out in public support of an impeachment inquiry into the president following the publication of details about Trump's efforts to persuade Ukraine's president to launch a criminal investigation into former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenSenate blocks push to subpoena Bolton in impeachment trial Sanders, Biden campaigns ramp up attacks over Social Security Biden endorsed by four more members of Congressional Black Caucus MORE while delaying military aid to the nation.

His support of the inquiry, among other centrist Democratic lawmakers representing seats won by Democrats from Republicans in the midterms, is credited with swaying the opinion of Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOvernight Health Care: Justices won't fast-track ObamaCare case before election | New virus spreads from China to US | Collins challenger picks up Planned Parenthood endorsement Why Senate Republicans should eagerly call witnesses to testify Trump health chief: 'Not a need' for ObamaCare replacement plan right now MORE (D-Calif.) in favor of an impeachment probe.