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Dem lawmaker rips O'Rourke: 'I don't think losing is cool'

Dem lawmaker rips O'Rourke: 'I don't think losing is cool'
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Rep. Max RoseMax RoseCentrist Democrats got their COVID bill, now they want a vote Lawmakers fear voter backlash over failure to reach COVID-19 relief deal The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by The Air Line Pilots Association - Pence lauds Harris as 'experienced debater'; Trump, Biden diverge over debate prep MORE (D-N.Y.) sharply criticized former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeTexas Dems highlight health care in fight to flip state House Union leader vows 'infrequent' minority voters will help deliver Biden victory Jimmy Carter says his son smoked pot with Willie Nelson on White House roof MORE (D-Texas) in an interview published Friday, accusing the former congressman of turning a losing Senate bid into social media stardom.

In an interview published in New York magazine's "Intelligencer," Rose lashed out at O'Rourke after the Texas Democrat criticized members of the party who do not support bold action on gun control and other issues. O'Rourke is a supporter of a federally mandated buyback of assault weapons.

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“I don’t think losing is cool. I want the Democratic Party to be the party of Kyrsten Sinema and not the party of Beto O’Rourke,” Rose said, referring to the first-term Arizona senator.

"Losing is not as cool as he thinks it is," the Staten Island congressman added to the magazine.

“When you win you get to help people, and when you lose you get to be a social-media rock star," Rose said. "So I don’t think Beto is cool, and I don’t think losing is cool. If we don’t win, we can’t do a f---ing thing for anybody in a union, anybody in public housing, anybody that can’t reunite with their family because of a f---ing racist Muslim ban."

Rose's comments are by far the sharpest public blowback to O'Rourke's pressure on Democrats to support a federally mandated assault weapons buyback, a position O'Rourke focused his campaign on after a deadly mass shooting in El Paso, his hometown, in August.

O'Rourke left Congress after losing a bid against Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSenate Republicans offer constitutional amendment to block Supreme Court packing 10 bellwether counties that could signal where the election is headed Conservatives seize on New York Post story to push Section 230 reform MORE (R-Texas) last year and subsequently announced a run for the presidency, though his campaign has failed to break into the top tier of contenders.

Rose, who represents a district won by President TrumpDonald John TrumpNearly 300 former national security officials sign Biden endorsement letter DC correspondent on the death of Michael Reinoehl: 'The folks I know in law enforcement are extremely angry about it' Late night hosts targeted Trump over Biden 97 percent of the time in September: study MORE in 2016, came out in public support of an impeachment inquiry into the president following the publication of details about Trump's efforts to persuade Ukraine's president to launch a criminal investigation into former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenNearly 300 former national security officials sign Biden endorsement letter Trump narrows Biden's lead in Pennsylvania: poll Florida breaks first-day early voting record with 350K ballots cast MORE while delaying military aid to the nation.

His support of the inquiry, among other centrist Democratic lawmakers representing seats won by Democrats from Republicans in the midterms, is credited with swaying the opinion of Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiGOP blocks Schumer effort to adjourn Senate until after election GOP noncommittal about vote on potential Trump-Pelosi coronavirus deal Overnight Health Care: Trump takes criticism of Fauci to a new level | GOP Health Committee chairman defends Fauci | Birx confronted Pence about Atlas MORE (D-Calif.) in favor of an impeachment probe.