Williamson slams DNC, Tuesday's debate: 'This would all be funny if it weren't so dangerous'

Williamson slams DNC, Tuesday's debate: 'This would all be funny if it weren't so dangerous'
© Greg Nash

Presidential candidate and author Marianne WilliamsonMarianne Williamson 2020 Democrats demand action on guns after Santa Clarita shooting Williamson announces poverty plan with support for universal basic income, minimum wage Yang seeks donations for 2020 rival Marianne Williamson: 'She has much more to say' MORE excoriated the Democratic National Committee (DNC) in a Washington Post op-ed Wednesday night, accusing the DNC of working to exclude candidates who do not discuss a "preordained category of topics."

In the fiery column, Williamson argued that polling and individual donor requirements set by the DNC in order to qualify for debate state invitations had created a "false, inauthentic piece of high school theater posing as the Democratic debates."

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"This would all be funny if it weren’t so dangerous. For reasons not easy to detect, the Democrats are held to a higher standard by the American people — who, despite a bad rap and a few spectacular failures, are usually good at smelling a rat," Williamson argued.

"Try as they might to throw people off the scent, the DNC and its media pals are creating the stench of inauthenticity at exactly the moment when some blazing truths should be shining through," she added.

Williamson, whose campaign was marked by standout performances during previous Democratic debates, failed to qualify for Tuesday's debate in Ohio, where 12 candidates appeared onstage in the largest one-night debate event ever.

In her op-ed Wednesday, she likened her exclusion from the debate to the Russian government's reported efforts to interfere in the 2016 presidential election.

"The Russians are messing with our elections? Absolutely. But so are we. The old days of political backroom deals, where a few insiders determined who the candidate would be, are back," Williamson argued.

The author, who moved to Iowa earlier this year, has fallen behind other candidates in the polls and also failed to qualify for September's debate.