Super PAC seeks to spend more than $1 million supporting Yang

Super PAC seeks to spend more than $1 million supporting Yang
© Greg Nash

Democratic presidential candidate Andrew YangAndrew YangNew Quinnipiac poll finds Biden leading in New Hampshire Intercollegiate athletics just got a two-minute warning AI and automation will disrupt our world — but only Andrew Yang is warning about it MORE has the support of a new super PAC, with the group seeking to raise more than $1 million to boost his White House bid.

Vox's Recode first reported that the Math PAC, which was established in September, will engage in both paid media and voter outreach in a number of early voting states.

The group seeks to spend more than seven figures backing Yang's bid, according to Recode.

The group's website states that it "will work to ensure that American’s know that Andrew Yang is our best chance of defeating Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpFive landmark moments of testimony to Congress Lindsey Graham basks in the impeachment spotlight Democrats sharpen their message on impeachment MORE."

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"We conduct targeted advertising, plan events, and launch outreach initiatives, so Americans learn what is at stake this election cycle and into the future," it reads. "It is time America elects a President that has done the math so the economy can start to put PEOPLE first."

Will Hailer, who is leading the committee, told Recode that the group's fundraising will “allow the movement behind Andrew Yang to catch up to elected officials — who were able to transfer years of war chests to their presidential campaigns."

“He is running against governors, senators, and institutional actors that have these apparatuses that they can automatically tap into,” Hailer said. “So the only way to be able to give voice to an incredibly important conversation is to find ways to add value to that voice. And that’s what we’re hoping to do through the super PAC.”

Yang previously declared that he will not accept any PAC money. The businessman has also called for an end to super PACs on his campaign website.

"We need to end Super PACs, drown out their influence, and stop pretending that corporations have equal rights to people," his website reads.

The Hill has reached out to Yang's campaign for comment about the new PAC.

Several other 2020 contenders have sworn off money from super PACs, including Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenOvernight Energy: BLM staff face choice of relocation or resignation as agency moves | Trump says he's 'very much into climate' | EPA rule would expand limits on scientific studies Krystal Ball credits Gabbard's upswing in 2020 race to 'feckless' Democratic establishment Outsider candidates outpoll insider candidates MORE (D-Mass.), former Rep. Beto O'RourkeBeto O'RourkeO'Rourke says he 'absolutely' plans to stay in politics Krystal Ball: Buttigieg is 'the boomer candidate' Language is a weapon in political warfare — if the media play along MORE (D-Texas), Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardNew Quinnipiac poll finds Biden leading in New Hampshire Gabbard lawyers demand retraction of Clinton's 'defamation' Krystal Ball praises former McConnell aide's historic win in Kentucky MORE (D-Hawaii) and former Obama Cabinet Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julián Castro.

Yang, who was relatively unknown before he launched his 2020 bid, has defied fundraising expectations, raising $10 million in the third quarter.

He has lagged around 2 percent support in national polls though has drawn more attention in polls of early voting states.

An Iowa poll released this week found Yang at 5 percent support, ahead of politicians such as Montana Gov. Steve BullockSteve BullockPress: Another billionaire need not apply Obama's former chief economist advising Buttigieg The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump says Dems shouldn't hold public hearings MORE (D) at 4 percent, and Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisOutsider candidates outpoll insider candidates Poll: Buttigieg leads Democratic field in Iowa Press: Another billionaire need not apply MORE (D-Calif.) at 2 percent.