Democrats lead Trump by wide margins in Minnesota

 
The survey, conducted by Mason-Dixon on behalf of the Minneapolis Star Tribune, shows each of four tested Democratic candidates leading Trump by wide margins.
 
The poll shows former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden alleges Sanders campaign 'doctored video' to attack him on Social Security record Sanders campaign responds to Biden doctored video claims: Biden should 'stop trying to doctor' public record Capt. "Sully" Sullenberger pens op-ed in defense of Biden: 'I stuttered once, too. I dare you to mock me' MORE leading Trump by a 50 percent to 38 percent margin. Trump trails Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenThe Memo: Sanders-Warren battle could reshape Democratic primary Environmental activists interrupt Buttigieg in New Hampshire Pence to visit Iowa days before caucuses MORE (D-Mass.) 51 percent to 40 percent, and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden alleges Sanders campaign 'doctored video' to attack him on Social Security record Sanders campaign responds to Biden doctored video claims: Biden should 'stop trying to doctor' public record The Memo: Sanders-Warren battle could reshape Democratic primary MORE (I-Vt.) 49 percent to 40 percent.
 
Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharSanders to headline Iowa event amid impeachment trial On The Money — Presented by Wells Fargo — Sanders defends vote against USMCA | China sees weakest growth in 29 years | Warren praises IRS move on student loans Poll: Sanders holds 5-point lead over Buttigieg in New Hampshire MORE (D-Minn.) would win her home state among respondents by the widest margin — she takes 55 percent of the vote against Trump’s 38 percent.
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All four of the Democrats hold leads over Trump among male respondents and among independents. They all take more than 50 percent of the vote among women surveyed. And they lead Trump by margins of 44 percentage points to 51 percentage points in Hennepin and Ramsey counties, the two most populous in the state.
 
Trump runs competitively with or just ahead of Democrats in the Twin City suburbs and in the rural north and south. Klobuchar is the only Democratic candidate running even or ahead of Trump outside the Twin Cities.
 
Republicans have long seen Minnesota as a potential to grow their path to the 270 electoral votes necessary to win the White House. The 2008 Republican convention was held in the Twin Cities, where then-Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainMartha McSally fundraises off 'liberal hack' remark to CNN reporter Meghan McCain blasts NY Times: 'Everyone already knows how much you despise' conservative women GOP senator calls CNN reporter a 'liberal hack' when asked about Parnas materials MORE (R-Ariz.) accepted his party’s presidential nomination. Trump lost the state to Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham Clinton Democrats plot new approach to win over rural voters The Memo: Sanders-Warren battle could reshape Democratic primary Rosenstein says he authorized release of Strzok-Page texts MORE by just 45,000 votes in 2016.
 
But Minnesota has the longest unbroken streak of voting Democratic in presidential contests of any state in the nation. The last Republican to win its electoral votes was Richard Nixon in 1972.
 
Still, Minnesota is changing rapidly, illustrated by tectonic shifts during the 2018 midterm elections. Last year, Democrats Dean PhillipsDean PhillipsHouse votes to temporarily repeal Trump SALT deduction cap Nearly all Democrats expected to back articles of impeachment First-term Democrats push Amash as impeachment manager: report MORE and Angie Craig won two Republican-held House seats in the Minneapolis-St. Paul suburbs, while Republicans captured two ancestrally Democratic seats, one in the Iron Range and one in rural southern Minnesota.
 
The Mason-Dixon poll, conducted October 14-16, surveyed 800 registered voters for a margin of error of 3.5 percentage points.