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Tim Ryan drops out of 2020 presidential race

Tim Ryan drops out of 2020 presidential race
© Greg Nash

Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanDemocrats confront difficult prospects for midterms Tim Ryan touts labor support in Senate bid Democratic leaders push to boost congressional staff pay MORE (D-Ohio) on Thursday announced he will exit the 2020 presidential race, ending a long-shot bid that failed to gain traction amid a crowded field of high-profile candidates.

“I got into this race in April to really give voice to the forgotten people of our country. I look forward to continuing that fight. Thank you, to everyone who supported this campaign,” Ryan said in a video posted to his Twitter account.

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In the video, titled “Giving Voice to the Forgotten,” Ryan said “I’ll be returning home to my family and friends and community in Ohio to run for reelection for my congressional seat.” The filing deadline for primary candidates in Ohio is Dec. 16.

Ryan is the third sitting representative to drop out of the race, following Reps. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellGOP struggles to rein in nativism Personal security costs for anti-Trump lawmakers spiked post-riot Trump knocks CNN for 'completely false' report Gaetz was denied meeting MORE (D-Calif.) and Seth MoultonSeth MoultonOvernight Defense: Iran talks set up balancing act for Biden | Pentagon on alert amid Russian saber rattling | Lawmakers urge Pentagon to be pickier about commanders' requests for more troops Is it okay to waste infrastructure dollars? Lawmakers want Pentagon, DOJ to punish current, former military members who participated in riot MORE (D-Mass.). The only remaining sitting House member in the crowded field is Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardFox News says network and anchor Leland Vittert have 'parted ways' New co-chairs named for congressional caucus for millennials Tulsi Gabbard blasts new House rules on gender neutral language as 'height of hypocrisy' MORE (D-Hawaii).

Ryan, a nine-term congressman, announced his presidential campaign in April, positioning himself as a moderate voice equipped to speak to concerns by working-class voters in regions of the country that voted for President TrumpDonald TrumpThe Memo: The Obamas unbound, on race Iran says onus is on US to rejoin nuclear deal on third anniversary of withdrawal Assaults on Roe v Wade increasing MORE after twice supporting former President Obama.

“I wanted to give voice to the forgotten communities that have been left behind by globalization and automation. And I’m proud of this campaign, because I believe we’ve done that,” Ryan said in the campaign video. “We’ve given voice to the forgotten communities and the forgotten people in the United States.”

He failed to gain much support, however, with his campaign reporting he raised $425,731 between July and September, far behind both the rest of the field and the $895,000 he raised in the second quarter of 2019. The RealClearPolitics polling average indicated his support in the primaries hovering around 0.6 percent.

Ryan qualified for the first two Democratic presidential debates in June and July but he failed to qualify beyond that. Ryan has not yet made a decision on an endorsement, according to his campaign.