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Tim Ryan drops out of 2020 presidential race

Tim Ryan drops out of 2020 presidential race
© Greg Nash

Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanHouse Democrats introduce bill to invest 0 billion in STEM research and education Now's the time to make 'Social Emotional Learning' a national priority Mourners gather outside Supreme Court after passing of Ruth Bader Ginsburg MORE (D-Ohio) on Thursday announced he will exit the 2020 presidential race, ending a long-shot bid that failed to gain traction amid a crowded field of high-profile candidates.

“I got into this race in April to really give voice to the forgotten people of our country. I look forward to continuing that fight. Thank you, to everyone who supported this campaign,” Ryan said in a video posted to his Twitter account.

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In the video, titled “Giving Voice to the Forgotten,” Ryan said “I’ll be returning home to my family and friends and community in Ohio to run for reelection for my congressional seat.” The filing deadline for primary candidates in Ohio is Dec. 16.

Ryan is the third sitting representative to drop out of the race, following Reps. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellJuan Williams: Defeated Trump is in legal peril Taylor Swift allows song to be used in campaign ad Graham says SC people of color can go anywhere in the state but 'need to be conservative, not liberal' MORE (D-Calif.) and Seth MoultonSeth MoultonUS national security policy in the 117th Congress and a new administration Overnight Defense: Trump fires Defense chief Mark Esper | Worries grow about rudderless post-election Pentagon | Esper firing hints at broader post-election shake-up | Pelosi says Esper firing shows Trump intent on sowing 'chaos' Democratic lawmakers lambast Trump over Esper firing as GOP remains mum MORE (D-Mass.). The only remaining sitting House member in the crowded field is Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardSix people whose election wins made history Next Congress expected to have record diversity Native Americans elected to Congress in record numbers this year MORE (D-Hawaii).

Ryan, a nine-term congressman, announced his presidential campaign in April, positioning himself as a moderate voice equipped to speak to concerns by working-class voters in regions of the country that voted for President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden team wants to understand Trump effort to 'hollow out government agencies' Trump's remaking of the judicial system Overnight Defense: Trump transgender ban 'inflicts concrete harms,' study says | China objects to US admiral's Taiwan visit MORE after twice supporting former President Obama.

“I wanted to give voice to the forgotten communities that have been left behind by globalization and automation. And I’m proud of this campaign, because I believe we’ve done that,” Ryan said in the campaign video. “We’ve given voice to the forgotten communities and the forgotten people in the United States.”

He failed to gain much support, however, with his campaign reporting he raised $425,731 between July and September, far behind both the rest of the field and the $895,000 he raised in the second quarter of 2019. The RealClearPolitics polling average indicated his support in the primaries hovering around 0.6 percent.

Ryan qualified for the first two Democratic presidential debates in June and July but he failed to qualify beyond that. Ryan has not yet made a decision on an endorsement, according to his campaign.