Maher: The Clintons need to 'go away' for 2020 election

Maher: The Clintons need to 'go away' for 2020 election
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Liberal comedian and commentator Bill MaherWilliam (Bill) MaherBill Maher to Joy Reid: 'Very nervous' about Biden's chances after GOP convention Bill Maher revives QAnon gag: 'I am Q' Oliver Stone, Bill Maher tangle on reliability of US intelligence on Russia: 'You think they're lying?' MORE said Friday that the Clintons need to "go away" for the 2020 presidential election.

“It seems like every few months, Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillicon Valley: FBI chief says Russia is trying to interfere in election to undermine Biden | Treasury Dept. sanctions Iranian government-backed hackers The Hill's Campaign Report: Arizona shifts towards Biden | Biden prepares for drive-in town hall | New Biden ad targets Latino voters FBI chief says Russia is trying to interfere in election to undermine Biden MORE bubbles up again and people are like, ‘Oh, she’s thinking about running’ or she says something crazy,” the “Real Time” host said during his HBO show Friday night.

“The Clintons — they’ve gotta go away. I’m saying this now a year out,” he added. “They can’t be at the convention. ... I’m serious. She is one of the biggest vote-getters.”

Maher then repeated Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashOn The Trail: How Nancy Pelosi could improbably become president History is on Edward Snowden's side: Now it's time to give him a full pardon Trump says he's considering Snowden pardon MORE's (I-Mich.) comment last week that Clinton is a “Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpHR McMaster says president's policy to withdraw troops from Afghanistan is 'unwise' Cast of 'Parks and Rec' reunite for virtual town hall to address Wisconsin voters Biden says Trump should step down over coronavirus response MORE asset,” adding, “She is.”

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“And Bill is damaged goods,” Maher said of former President Clinton.

Maher’s comments come amid ongoing uncertainty over the Democratic presidential race with 100 days to go until the Iowa caucuses.

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenCast of 'Parks and Rec' reunite for virtual town hall to address Wisconsin voters Biden says Trump should step down over coronavirus response Biden tells CNN town hall that he has benefited from white privilege MORE has sat atop most polls of the crowded Democratic field, though Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren, Schumer introduce plan for next president to cancel ,000 in student debt The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Don't expect a government check anytime soon No new taxes for the ultra rich — fix bad tax policy instead MORE (D-Mass.) has challenged him for the lead in recent polling. Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersMcConnell accuses Democrats of sowing division by 'downplaying progress' on election security The Hill's Campaign Report: Arizona shifts towards Biden | Biden prepares for drive-in town hall | New Biden ad targets Latino voters Why Democrats must confront extreme left wing incitement to violence MORE (I-Vt.) and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegBogeymen of the far left deserve a place in any Biden administration Overnight Defense: Woodward book causes new firestorm | Book says Trump lashed out at generals, told Woodward about secret weapons system | US withdrawing thousands of troops from Iraq A socially and environmentally just way to fight climate change MORE have also rounded out top positions in national surveys.

Trump has clashed with multiple Democratic presidential hopefuls as they battle for an opportunity to face him in the general election next year.

The president suggested earlier this month that Hillary Clinton should enter the race to "try and steal it away from Uber Left Elizabeth Warren." The former secretary of State then sparked social media buzz with her response: “Don’t tempt me.”

Hillary Clinton has been making the rounds in recent weeks to promote her new book, while people in her orbit told The Hill this week that there is no truth to rumors circulated by Republicans that she is seeking a third White House bid.

Trump defeated Hillary Clinton in the 2016 election by winning 304 votes in the Electoral College compared to her 227, though she won nearly 3 million more ballots nationwide.