Biden insists he plans on doing 'very well' in Iowa, New Hampshire

Biden insists he plans on doing 'very well' in Iowa, New Hampshire
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Democratic presidential candidate Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Americans debate life under COVID-19 risks Biden set to make risky economic argument against Trump Hillicon Valley: Tech companies lead way on WFH forever | States and counties plead for cybersecurity assistance | Trump weighing anti-conservative bias panel MORE said Tuesday that he plans to do “very well” in Iowa and New Hampshire amid questions about whether he can win the early primary and caucus states. 

Asked in an MSNBC interview about the early contests, Biden said, “I plan on doing very well in both those."

“The polls, as you know, are up and down," he continued. "I’ve been ahead in Iowa. I’ve been ahead in South Carolina. I’m ahead in all the national polls with the occasional one that pops up that’s different."

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The polling aggregation site RealClearPolitics has Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenPentagon charts its own course on COVID-19, risking Trump's ire Warren to host high-dollar fundraiser for Biden It's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process MORE (D-Mass.) ahead of Biden in the polls in both Iowa and New Hampshire with fewer than 100 days before the Iowa caucus.

The Massachusetts senator leads the former vice president by an average of 5 points in Iowa and 3.3 points in New Hampshire, according to RealClearPolitics.  

In recent weeks Biden’s campaign has suggested that he could lose Iowa and New Hampshire and still win the nominating contest after big wins in South Carolina and Nevada, but Democratic donors interviewed by The Hill on Tuesday expressed doubts.

“The real challenge isn’t whether he can fight another day in South Carolina, but whether he can show the resilience and determination necessary to fight in Iowa,” said Robert Zimmerman, a major Democratic donor and Democratic National Committee member. “The early contests historically are very defining for choosing the nominee."

Another Democratic fundraiser who helped propel recent Democratic nominees, including President Obama and former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Americans debate life under COVID-19 risks The 10 Senate seats most likely to flip Stakes high for Collins in coronavirus relief standoff MORE, added that Biden's campaign strategy is "rather defeatist." 

"They're essentially saying, 'We're losing. Look to someone else,' and I think the big fear is that someone might," they said. "No one wants to support someone who is projecting defeat. Not ever. But especially not this year."  

Even Biden allies say something needs to change.  

"We're not doing something right, clearly," the ally said. "I can't imagine Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaThe 10 Senate seats most likely to flip What does Joe Biden believe about NASA, space exploration and commercial space? The star of tomorrow: Temptation and a career in politics reporting MORE ever saying, 'We'll lose in the first two states, but don't worry, we'll still win.'" 

Biden’s comments follow news that he has less cash on hand than other major Democratic contenders like Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersHillicon Valley: Tech companies lead way on WFH forever | States and counties plead for cybersecurity assistance | Trump weighing anti-conservative bias panel Biden wins Hawaii primary Warren to host high-dollar fundraiser for Biden MORE (I-Vt.) and Warren.

Biden, Sanders and Warren are among more than a dozen candidates seeking the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. 

Brett Samuels contributed.