Poll: Biden leads Warren by 12 points in Pennsylvania

Poll: Biden leads Warren by 12 points in Pennsylvania
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Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden looks to shore up lead in S.C. Hillicon Valley: Dems cancel surveillance vote after pushback to amendments | Facebook to ban certain coronavirus ads | Lawmakers grill online ticketing execs | Hacker accessed facial recognition company's database Vulnerable Democrats brace for Sanders atop ticket MORE has a strong lead among in Pennsylvania's 2020 presidential primary, according to a survey released Thursday.

The Franklin & Marshall College Poll showed Biden earning 30 percent support among registered Democratic voters, leading Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenBiden looks to shore up lead in S.C. Hillicon Valley: Dems cancel surveillance vote after pushback to amendments | Facebook to ban certain coronavirus ads | Lawmakers grill online ticketing execs | Hacker accessed facial recognition company's database Push for national popular vote movement gets boost from conservatives MORE (D-Mass.), who received 18 percent support.

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The former vice president slightly widened his lead ahead of Warren since the last Franklin & Marshall Poll in July, when he received 28 percent support and the Massachusetts progressive had 21 percent.

Biden has led most national polls since he entered the race, but Warren has been gaining an edge on him, including in multiple early voting states.

The third 2020 Democratic top-tier candidate, Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersDNC warns campaigns about cybersecurity after attempted scam Overnight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Trump taps Pence to lead coronavirus response | Trump accuses Pelosi of trying to create panic | CDC confirms case of 'unknown' origin | Schumer wants .5 billion in emergency funds Biden looks to shore up lead in S.C. MORE (I-Vt.), held at 12 percent support in Thursday's survey. South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegBiden looks to shore up lead in S.C. Vulnerable Democrats brace for Sanders atop ticket The Hill's Campaign Report: Gloves off in South Carolina MORE reached 8 percent backing in the state, up from 6 percent three months ago.

Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardBiden leads by 18 points in South Carolina: poll Buttigieg notes diversity on debate stage: We're '7 white people talking about racial justice' Sanders grows lead in new Hill/HarrisX poll MORE (D-Hawaii), Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharBiden looks to shore up lead in S.C. The Hill's Campaign Report: Gloves off in South Carolina Lawmakers grill Ticketmaster, StubHub execs over online ticketing MORE (D-Minn.) and Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand Bennet Biden proposes 0B housing plan Nevada caucuses open with a few hiccups Overnight Energy: EPA moves to limit financial pressure on 'forever chemical' manufacturers | California sues Trump over water order| Buttigieg expands on climate plan MORE (D-Colo.) all had 2 percent support. Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisBiden looks to shore up lead in S.C. House passes historic legislation to make lynching a federal hate crime This week: House to vote on legislation to make lynching a federal hate crime MORE (D-Calif.), Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDemocrats' Obama-to-Sanders shift on charter schooling This week: House to vote on legislation to make lynching a federal hate crime Juan Williams: Black votes matter MORE (D-N.J.) and entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew Yang6 ways the primary fight is toughening up Democrats for the fall general election The Hill's Morning Report - Sanders steamrolls to South Carolina primary, Super Tuesday Yang calls on someone to 'pull an Andrew Yang' and bow out of 2020 race MORE sat at 1 percent.

Harris experienced the biggest drop, down from 8 percent support in July.

A total of 8 percent of participants reported they were undecided on their chosen candidate if the election was today.

Franklin & Marshall College surveyed 482 Pennsylvanian registered voters, including 226 Democrats, between Oct. 21 and 27. The margin of error for registered Democrats was plus or minus 8.9 percentage points.