Buttigieg says he didn't mean to predict a two-way race with Warren

 Buttigieg says he didn't mean to predict a two-way race with Warren
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South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegButtigieg launches new PAC to aid down-ballot candidates HuffPost political reporter on why Bernie fell way behind Biden Economists fear slow pace of testing will prolong recession MORE, a Democratic presidential hopeful, is walking back previous comments he made saying the Democratic primary could turn into a two-way race between him and Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenHillicon Valley: Schiff presses intel chief on staff changes | Warren offers plan to secure elections | Twitter's Jack Dorsey to donate B to coronavirus fight | WhatsApp takes steps to counter virus misinformation Warren releases plan to secure elections during coronavirus pandemic On The Money: Trump officials struggle to get relief loans out the door | Dow soars more than 1600 points | Kudlow says officials 'looking at' offering coronavirus bonds MORE (D-Mass.) after facing criticism from other contenders in the race. 

"I don’t remember the exact context," Buttigieg told reporters in Iowa on Saturday, referring to comments he originally made on Showtime's "The Circus" indicating that he saw the large Democratic field shrinking to a “two-way” race between himself and the Massachusetts senator.  

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The mayor on Saturday added that he did not think the comments came out right before emphasizing the strength of the other contenders in the race. 

"Look, the bottom line is this is a really strong competition among really strong campaigns," he said. 

Buttigieg on Monday was asked again about his two-way race comments in an appearance on CNN, answering that he was "not going to comment on the other campaigns." 

The mayor faced pushback for the comments over the weekend, notably from Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisHillicon Valley: Schiff presses intel chief on staff changes | Warren offers plan to secure elections | Twitter's Jack Dorsey to donate B to coronavirus fight | WhatsApp takes steps to counter virus misinformation WhatsApp limiting message forwarding in effort to stop coronavirus misinformation The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Dybul interview; Boris Johnson update MORE (D-Calif.), who called the remarks "naive." 

"Well, I think ... that it’s naive for him to think that at this point, that the fate of this election has been determined," she said on CBS's "Face the Nation." "Just look at history. You might need to review to know that what’s happening right now is not necessarily determinative of the outcome."

Buttigieg has risen in recent Iowa polls, polling in the top four with Warren, former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump shakes up WH communications team The Hill's Campaign Report: Wisconsin votes despite coronavirus pandemic The Intercept's Ryan Grim says Cuomo is winning over critics MORE and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersDrugmaker caps insulin costs at to help diabetes patients during pandemic The Hill's Campaign Report: Wisconsin votes despite coronavirus pandemic Sen. Brown endorses Biden for president MORE (I-Vt.). 

In addition to gaining traction in polls, Buttigieg has also exchanged jabs with Warren. 

Buttigieg knocked Warren's "Medicare for All" plan as a "my way or the highway" approach on Sunday. 

“What is just not true is that hers is the only solution. This 'my way or the highway' idea. That either you’re for kicking everybody off their private plans in four years or you’re for business as usual, it’s just not true,” Buttigieg said on ABC’s “This Week.”