Ocasio-Cortez jabs 'plutocratic' late entrants to 2020 field

Ocasio-Cortez jabs 'plutocratic' late entrants to 2020 field
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Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezLongtime Rep. Lacy Clay defeated in Missouri Democratic primary Trump campaign rolls out TV spots in early voting states after advertising pause Trump adviser Jason Miller: Biden running mate pick 'his political living will' MORE (D-N.Y.) took a shot at unnamed “plutocratic, long-shot, very-late presidential bids” Thursday amid former Massachusetts Gov. Deval PatrickDeval PatrickIt's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process Top Democratic super PACs team up to boost Biden Andrew Yang endorses Biden in 2020 race MORE’s (D) announcement he was entering the race and former New York City Mayor Michael BloombergMichael BloombergHillicon Valley: Trump raises idea of delaying election, faces swift bipartisan pushback | Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google release earnings reports | Senators ask Justice Department to investigate TikTok, Zoom Meme group joins with Lincoln Project in new campaign against Trump The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump pivots on convention; GOP punts on virus bill MORE’s preparation to do so.

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“Call me radical, but maybe instead of setting ablaze hundreds of millions of dollars on multiple plutocratic, long-shot, very-late presidential bids, we instead invest hundreds of millions into winning majorities of state legislatures across the United States? Just a thought!” Ocasio-Cortez tweeted Thursday.

Patrick, who went on to work at Bain Capital, the Boston-based private investment firm founded by Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyNRCC poll finds McBath ahead of Handel in Georgia Unemployment debate sparks GOP divisions Senate GOP divided over whether they'd fill Supreme Court vacancy  MORE (R-Utah), announced his entry, banking on reports that centrist elements of the party are losing faith in former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenMark Kelly clinches Democratic Senate nod in Arizona Hillicon Valley: NSA warns of new security threats | Teen accused of Twitter hack pleads not guilty | Experts warn of mail-in voting misinformation Biden offers well wishes to Lebanon after deadly explosion MORE and seeking an alternative.

Bloomberg, who plans to enter several late races after sitting out the early primaries and caucuses, is expected to appeal to similar elements.

Billionaire Tom SteyerTom SteyerSteyer endorses reparations bill, commits to working with Jackson Lee Progressive group launches M pro-Biden ad buy targeting young voters The Hill's Campaign Report: Jacksonville mandates face coverings as GOP convention approaches MORE, meanwhile, has been in the race since July but entered several months after most of the candidates and was the most recent entrant into the field until Patrick's announcement.

Ocasio-Cortez joined Reps. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarLongtime Rep. Lacy Clay defeated in Missouri Democratic primary Police committed 125 human rights violations during Floyd protests: Amnesty Trump campaign rolls out TV spots in early voting states after advertising pause MORE (D-Minn.) and Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibLongtime Rep. Lacy Clay defeated in Missouri Democratic primary The Hill's Campaign Report: Even the Post Office is political now | Primary action tonight | Super PACS at war Five primary races to watch on Tuesday MORE (D-Mich.) in endorsing Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersLongtime Rep. Lacy Clay defeated in Missouri Democratic primary Hillicon Valley: NSA warns of new security threats | Teen accused of Twitter hack pleads not guilty | Experts warn of mail-in voting misinformation Schiff, Khanna call for free masks for all Americans in coronavirus aid package MORE (I-Vt.) earlier this fall, while the fourth member of the “squad” of progressive freshman congresswomen, Rep. Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyLongtime Rep. Lacy Clay defeated in Missouri Democratic primary Stimulus checks debate now focuses on size, eligibility Tlaib opens up about why she hasn't endorsed Biden yet MORE (D-Mass.), endorsed Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenTrump says government to review 5M Kodak loan deal Michelle Obama supporters urge Biden to pick former first lady as running mate On The Money: Unemployment debate sparks GOP divisions | Pandemic reveals flaws of unemployment insurance programs | Survey finds nearly one-third of rehired workers laid off again MORE (D-Mass.) earlier this month.

Both Sanders and Warren have been top targets in recent weeks from their centrist and moderate competitors in the crowded Democratic field, including Biden and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegFormer Indiana Gov. Joe Kernan dies How Republicans can embrace environmentalism and win In politics, as in baseball, it ain't over till it's over MORE.