Bloomberg to spend $100M on anti-Trump ads in battleground states

Bloomberg to spend $100M on anti-Trump ads in battleground states
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Former New York City Mayor Michael BloombergMichael BloombergWhy Democrats' .5 trillion reconciliation bill is a losing game Democrats must win big on health care to have a shot in the midterms Stacey Abrams PAC tops 0 million raised MORE plans to drop $100 million on anti-Trump ads in key swing states during the 2020 election.

The digital ad campaign will focus on Arizona, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, four states Democrats are eager to flip into their column next year, and will run starting Friday through the end of the primary season. The ads will not feature Bloomberg himself.

“Mike isn’t waiting to take on the President, he's starting now. This is all hands on deck,” Bloomberg spokesman Jason Schechter told The Hill. 

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One ad shared with The Hill shows the top of President TrumpDonald TrumpPoll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Biden flexes presidential muscle on campaign trail with Virginia's McAuliffe Has Trump beaten the system? MORE's Twitter page with the caption "A TWEET SHOULDN'T THREATEN OUR NATION'S NATIONAL SECURITY," an apparent reference to the president's tendency to announce significant changes in foreign policy over social media.

The announcement of the ad campaign comes as Bloomberg takes steps to plunge into the crowded 2020 Democratic primary field, a move that could upheave the party’s presidential nominating contest. The former mayor filed paperwork to appear in the Alabama and Arkansas primaries but did not file paperwork for the crucial New Hampshire primary by the Friday deadline.

The $100 million investment could serve as a counterbalance to Trump’s gargantuan campaign bank account. The president and the Republican National Committee have combined to raise $308 million so far this year and started November with $156 million in cash reserves.

Bloomberg, a centrist who is worth approximately $50 billion, could be on a collision course with former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden authorizes up to 0M for Afghan refugees Poll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Biden flexes presidential muscle on campaign trail with Virginia's McAuliffe MORE and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegJD Vance takes aim at culture wars, childless politicians Poll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary The Hill's Morning Report - High-profile COVID-19 infections spark new worries MORE, the leading moderates in the Democratic race, should he officially enter the contest. He could also draw fire from progressives such as Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersPoll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Overnight Defense: US launches another airstrike in Somalia | Amendment to expand Pentagon recusal period added to NDAA | No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia US launches second Somalia strike in week MORE (I-Vt.) and Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenPoll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Overnight Defense: US launches another airstrike in Somalia | Amendment to expand Pentagon recusal period added to NDAA | No. 2 State Dept. official to lead nuclear talks with Russia Warren-backed amendment to expand Pentagon recusal period added to defense bill MORE (D-Mass.), who claim that he is trying to buy his way into the election. 

Despite his virtually endless resources, Bloomberg would still face an uphill battle to clinch the Democratic Party’s nomination — his competitors have been canvassing and organizing across the country for months, and national polling shows him in the low single digits.

Updated on Nov. 16 at 7:17 a.m.