Bloomberg vows not to take campaign donations, presidential salary

Bloomberg vows not to take campaign donations, presidential salary
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An adviser to Michael BloombergMichael BloombergEverytown on the NRA lawsuit: 'Come November, we're going to make sure they're out of power, too' Hillicon Valley: Trump raises idea of delaying election, faces swift bipartisan pushback | Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google release earnings reports | Senators ask Justice Department to investigate TikTok, Zoom Meme group joins with Lincoln Project in new campaign against Trump MORE said the former New York City mayor won't accept political donations or a presidential salary.  

“He has never taken a political contribution in his life. He is not about to start,” Bloomberg chief adviser Howard Wolfson told The Associated Press. “He cannot be bought.”

Wolfson's comment comes as Bloomberg, a billionaire, appears poised to join the crowded 2020 Democratic presidential field. 

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While current candidates have expressed that the primary race does not need one of the world's richest people, Wolfson stressed that Bloomberg's money makes him independent. 

He told the AP that Bloomberg “is wholly independent of special interests, will not take a dime in any contribution, and never has in any of his three races.”

Wolfson added that Bloomberg is willing to spend "whatever it takes to defeat Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocrat calls on White House to withdraw ambassador to Belarus nominee TikTok collected data from mobile devices to track Android users: report Peterson wins Minnesota House primary in crucial swing district MORE.” 

Bloomberg would face an uphill battle if he runs for the Democratic nomination, since other candidates have been campaigning for months. Even though he has not officially announced his candidacy, he has purchased a $31.5 million ad blitz across several states. 

The former mayor is worth more than $54 billion according to Forbes.

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News of Bloomberg's possible 2020 bid sparked strong criticism from other candidates, especially those who are on the progressive end of the democratic spectrum. Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden wins Connecticut in final presidential primary of year Vermont Rep. Peter Welch easily wins primary Three pros and three cons to Biden picking Harris MORE's campaign manager said in a statement at the time that, "More billionaires seeking more political power surely isn't the change America needs." 

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenKamala Harris: The conventional (and predictable) pick all along On The Money: McConnell says it's time to restart coronavirus talks | New report finds majority of Americans support merger moratorium | Corporate bankruptcies on pace for 10-year high Hillicon Valley: Facebook removed over 22 million posts for hate speech in second quarter | Republicans introduce bill to defend universities against hackers targeting COVID-19 research | Facebook's Sandberg backs Harris as VP pick MORE (D-Mass.) welcomed Bloomberg to the race by referring him to her "Calculator for Billionaires" to show how much he'd pay under her tax plan.