Klobuchar knocks Bloomberg and Steyer's presidential bids

Klobuchar knocks Bloomberg and Steyer's presidential bids
© Aaron Schwartz

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharBiden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee Delaney to DNC: Open second debate stage for candidates who qualified for past events There's a lot to like about the Senate privacy bill, if it's not watered down MORE (D-Minn.) knocked fellow Democratic presidential candidates Tom SteyerThomas (Tom) Fahr SteyerEmanuel jokes: 'I'm a new, mellow Rahm' Booker campaign rakes in million after Harris exits 2020 race Biden: All-white debate not representative of party, but 'you can't dictate' nominee MORE and Michael BloombergMichael Rubens BloombergBannon: Clinton waiting to enter 2020 race and 'save the Democratic Party from Michael Bloomberg' Bloomberg reporting policy not pretty or perfect, but right Booker campaign rakes in million after Harris exits 2020 race MORE on Monday, saying Americans do not want a billionaire in the White House.

“When I watched TV last night, all I saw were two billionaires' ads,” Klobuchar said on ABC's “The View."

“For a lot of the people that aren’t in the early states, they must think two people are running,” she said, arguing that other candidates can’t afford to fund expensive television ads.

Klobuchar added that she doesn’t think voters want to replace President TrumpDonald John TrumpLawmakers prep ahead of impeachment hearing Democrats gear up for high-stakes Judiciary hearing Warren says she made almost M from legal work over past three decades MORE with a billionaire.

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“I don’t think America looks at the guy in the White House and says, ‘Let’s find someone richer,’” she said.

Klobuchar argued that as one of only two Democratic presidential candidates from the Midwest, she is best positioned to win over swing voters who backed Trump in 2016.

“I’m someone who can bring those votes in,” she said.

Steyer, who has an estimated net worth of $1.6 billion, made most of his money operating a hedge fund in California.

Bloomberg, the founder of Bloomberg L.P. who later was elected to three terms as mayor of New York City, said when announcing his White House bid last month that his campaign would be self-funded and he would not accept any donations.

“You just can’t simply allow wealthy people to come in and buy elections,” Klobuchar said.