Warren hits Bloomberg, Steyer: They have 'been allowed to buy their way' into 2020 race

Warren hits Bloomberg, Steyer: They have 'been allowed to buy their way' into 2020 race
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Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenBiden's fiscal program: What is the likely market impact? Warren, Schumer introduce plan for next president to cancel ,000 in student debt The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Don't expect a government check anytime soon MORE (D-Mass.) on Tuesday swiped at businessman Tom SteyerTom SteyerTV ads favored Biden 2-1 in past month Inslee calls Biden climate plan 'perfect for the moment' OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Trump administration finalizes plan to open up Alaska wildlife refuge to drilling | California finalizes fuel efficiency deal with five automakers, undercutting Trump | Democrats use vulnerable GOP senators to get rare win on environment MORE and former New York City Mayor Michael BloombergMichael BloombergTop Democratic super PAC launches Florida ad blitz after Bloomberg donation The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Latest with the COVID-19 relief bill negotiations The Memo: 2020 is all about winning Florida MORE following a shakeup in the 2020 White House race with Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisHarris honors Ginsburg, visits Supreme Court The Hill's Campaign Report: Trump and Biden vie for Minnesota | Early voting begins in four states | Blue state GOP governors back Susan Collins Kamala Harris: Black Americans have been 'disproportionately harmed' by Trump MORE (D-Calif.) ending her White House bid.

Warren lamented that Harris and Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandSunday shows preview: Justice Ginsburg dies, sparking partisan battle over vacancy before election Suburban moms are going to decide the 2020 election Jon Stewart urges Congress to help veterans exposed to burn pits MORE (D-N.Y.), who dropped out of the Democratic primary in late August, were forced to end their campaigns while she asserted that wealthier candidates such as Bloomberg and Steyer were able to “buy their way” into the race.

“Kamala Harris and Kirsten Gillibrand—two women senators who, together, won more than 11.5 million votes in their last elections—have been forced out of this race, while billionaires Tom Steyer and Michael Bloomberg have been allowed to buy their way in,” Warren wrote in a fundraising email.

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“Running for president shouldn’t be a passion project for bored billionaires. Billionaires shouldn’t have the power to recruit their other billionaire friends into this race, or make threats about what they’ll do to the American economy if they don’t get their way,” she added, an apparent reference to reports that Amazon founder Jeff BezosJeffrey (Jeff) Preston BezosTwitter mandates lawmakers, journalists to beef up passwords heading into election Hillicon Valley: DOJ indicts Chinese, Malaysian hackers accused of targeting over 100 organizations | GOP senators raise concerns over Oracle-TikTok deal | QAnon awareness jumps in new poll Amazon planning small delivery hubs in suburbs MORE asked Bloomberg to enter the race.

Warren’s rhetoric echoed Harris’s own email to supporters announcing she was suspending her campaign Tuesday.

“I’m not a billionaire. I can’t fund my own campaign. And as the campaign has gone on, it’s become harder and harder to raise the money we need to compete,” Harris wrote. “In good faith, I can’t tell you, my supporters and volunteers, that I have a path forward if I don’t believe I do.”

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharThe Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by The Air Line Pilots Association - White House moves closer to Pelosi on virus relief bill EPA delivers win for ethanol industry angered by waivers to refiners It's time for newspapers to stop endorsing presidential candidates MORE (D-Minn.), another 2020 presidential hopeful, also took a shot at the two candidates on ABC’s “The View” on Tuesday, saying “I don’t think America looks at the guy in the White House and says, ‘Let’s find someone richer.’"