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Bloomberg putting tens of millions behind new national ad campaign

Bloomberg putting tens of millions behind new national ad campaign
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Michael BloombergMichael BloombergBiden's great challenge: Build an economy for long-term prosperity and security The secret weapon in Biden's fight against climate change Sanders celebrates Biden-Harris victory: 'Thank God democracy won out' MORE is dropping tens of millions of dollars on a new national television ad, according to a report from The Associated Press.

The buy is in addition to Bloomberg’s already-outsize spending on advertising. When he entered the race for the Democratic presidential nomination late last month, the billionaire businessman and former New York City mayor rolled out a $37 million ad buy spanning roughly 100 media markets.

Bloomberg’s campaign did not offer an exact figure for the cost of his latest national ad spot, but said it was similar to his initial buy, the AP reported.

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No Democratic presidential candidate has come close to spending as much on television as Bloomberg has with the exception of Tom SteyerTom SteyerBiden Cabinet picks largely unify Democrats — so far Late donor surges push election spending projections to new heights New voters surge to the polls MORE, another billionaire who has spent about $60 million so far.

The new national ad buy is set to begin airing on Wednesday in all 50 states and will continue over the next two weeks, according to the AP report.

Bloomberg’s campaign did not immediately respond to an inquiry from The Hill.

“Mike Bloomberg’s never been afraid of tough fights – the ones that make a true difference in people’s lives,” the ad says, according to the AP. “And Mike’s won them.”

In the spot, Bloomberg homes in on his argument that he is the candidate best positioned to defeat President TrumpDonald John TrumpVenezuela judge orders prison time for 6 American oil executives Trump says he'll leave White House if Biden declared winner of Electoral College The Memo: Biden faces tough road on pledge to heal nation MORE in the 2020 general election.

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But before he can take on Trump directly, Bloomberg will have to get through a grueling primary race in which he faces rival Democrats who have been campaigning much longer than he has.

Most polls show the top tier of the Democratic primary field narrowed down to four candidates: former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump says he'll leave White House if Biden declared winner of Electoral College The Memo: Biden faces tough road on pledge to heal nation US records 2,300 COVID-19 deaths as pandemic rises with holidays MORE, Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Memo: Biden faces tough road on pledge to heal nation Clyburn: Biden falling short on naming Black figures to top posts Prepare for buyers' remorse when Biden/Harris nationalize health care MORE (I-Vt.), Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenThe Memo: Biden faces tough road on pledge to heal nation Disney laying off 32,000 workers as coronavirus batters theme parks Kamala Harris, Stacey Abrams among nominees for Time magazine's 2020 Person of the Year MORE (D-Mass.) and South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete Buttigieg'Biff is president': Michael J. Fox says Trump has played on 'every worst instinct in mankind' Buttigieg: Denying Biden intelligence briefings is about protecting Trump's 'ego' Biden's win is not a policy mandate — he should govern accordingly MORE.

At the same time, Bloomberg has already begun facing accusations that he is seeking to buy the Democratic nomination by throwing millions from his personal fortune into his campaign. 

He has other political liabilities, as well. He only registered as a Democrat in 2018 after spending more than a decade as an independent. Between 2001 and 2007 he was a registered Republican. 

He has also faced questions about his record as New York City’s mayor, particularly his advocacy for so-called stop-and-frisk policing strategies that disproportionately targeted men of color. Bloomberg apologized last month for pushing those policies, saying that he was wrong to do so.