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Bloomberg on 2020 rivals blasting him for using his own money: 'They had a chance to go out and make a lot of money'

Bloomberg on 2020 rivals blasting him for using his own money: 'They had a chance to go out and make a lot of money'
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Former New York City Mayor Michael BloombergMichael BloombergBiden's great challenge: Build an economy for long-term prosperity and security The secret weapon in Biden's fight against climate change Sanders celebrates Biden-Harris victory: 'Thank God democracy won out' MORE blasted his 2020 Democratic rivals for criticizing him for self-funding his campaign, saying they had a chance to "make a lot of money."

"The point they're making is it's OK if they ask other people for all of their money, and it will help their careers," Bloomberg told CBS News in an interview that aired on Friday.

Bloomberg said he instead prefers to give away his earned money to causes he cares about, like public health, education and the environment. 

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"I think I could do a lot of good for the country if I could become president, and so using some of [that] money to fund the campaign is fine," he said. 

Bloomberg noted that he did not come from money and worked hard to be a successful businessman. 

"I give a hundred percent of the money away. What's wrong with all of that?" he added. "Ask them what they're doing. Why didn't they do that? They had a chance to go out and make a lot of money, and how much of their own money do they put into their own campaigns?" 

Progressive Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenBiden: 'Difficult decision' to staff administration with House, Senate members The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC - Trump OKs transition; Biden taps Treasury, State experience On The Money: Biden to nominate Yellen for Treasury secretary | 'COVID cliff' looms | Democrats face pressure to back smaller stimulus MORE (D-Mass.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden: 'Difficult decision' to staff administration with House, Senate members Hillicon Valley: YouTube suspends OANN amid lawmaker pressure | Dems probe Facebook, Twitter over Georgia runoff | FCC reaffirms ZTE's national security risk Biden Cabinet picks largely unify Democrats — so far MORE (I-Vt.) have slammed Bloomberg's entrance into the 2020 race, painting him as out of touch with the working class. 

"We do not believe that billionaires have the right to buy elections, and that is why we are going to overturn Citizens United, that is why multibillionaires like Mr. Bloomberg are not going to get very far in this election, that is why we are going to end voter suppression in America," Sanders said last month at a campaign event. 

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Warren pointed to fellow Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisBiden teams to meet with Trump administration agencies Biden: 'Difficult decision' to staff administration with House, Senate members Ossoff, Warnock to knock on doors in runoff campaigns MORE (D-Calif.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandDemocratic senators urge Facebook to take action on anti-Muslim bigotry Social media responds to Harris making history: 'I feel like our ancestors are rejoicing' Ocasio-Cortez says she doesn't plan on 'staying in the House forever' MORE (D-N.Y.) dropping out of the Democratic primary, arguing that they were forced to end their campaigns while Bloomberg and fellow billionaire Tom SteyerTom SteyerLate donor surges push election spending projections to new heights New voters surge to the polls Trump leads Biden in Texas by 4 points: poll MORE were able to buy their way into the race. 

While Bloomberg is ignoring the early contest states of Iowa and New Hampshire, he is laser-focused on the later Super Tuesday states. 

He launched a  multimillion-dollar ad buy across a number of states and media markets last month. 

The strategy, mixed with Bloomberg's high name recognition, appears to be having an impact in the polls. 

A Quinnipiac University poll released last month showed Bloomberg with the support of 3 percent of Democratic and left-leaning independent voters, higher than entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew YangMedia and Hollywood should stop their marching-to-Georgia talk Andrew Yang: Democrats need to adopt message that government is 'working for them' Andrew Yang moving to Georgia to help Democrats in Senate runoffs MORE and former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro, as well as Sens. Cory BookerCory BookerSenate Democrats reelect Schumer as leader by acclamation  Hill associations push for more diversity in lawmakers' staffs Sanders celebrates Biden-Harris victory: 'Thank God democracy won out' MORE (D-N.J.) and Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetDemocratic senators urge Facebook to take action on anti-Muslim bigotry Hickenlooper ousts Gardner in Colorado, handing Democrats vital pickup Lobbying world MORE (D-Colo.).