Bloomberg on 2020 rivals blasting him for using his own money: 'They had a chance to go out and make a lot of money'

Bloomberg on 2020 rivals blasting him for using his own money: 'They had a chance to go out and make a lot of money'

Former New York City Mayor Michael BloombergMichael Rubens BloombergDNC announces new criteria for New Hampshire debate Bloomberg receives 45-day extension for public financial disclosure report with FEC Bloomberg's congressional endorsers grow to three MORE blasted his 2020 Democratic rivals for criticizing him for self-funding his campaign, saying they had a chance to "make a lot of money."

"The point they're making is it's OK if they ask other people for all of their money, and it will help their careers," Bloomberg told CBS News in an interview that aired on Friday.

Bloomberg said he instead prefers to give away his earned money to causes he cares about, like public health, education and the environment. 

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"I think I could do a lot of good for the country if I could become president, and so using some of [that] money to fund the campaign is fine," he said. 

Bloomberg noted that he did not come from money and worked hard to be a successful businessman. 

"I give a hundred percent of the money away. What's wrong with all of that?" he added. "Ask them what they're doing. Why didn't they do that? They had a chance to go out and make a lot of money, and how much of their own money do they put into their own campaigns?" 

Progressive Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenSanders to headline Iowa event amid impeachment trial Hill.TV's Saagar Enjeti rips Sanders over handling of feud with Warren On The Money — Presented by Wells Fargo — Sanders defends vote against USMCA | China sees weakest growth in 29 years | Warren praises IRS move on student loans MORE (D-Mass.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders to headline Iowa event amid impeachment trial Hill.TV's Saagar Enjeti rips Sanders over handling of feud with Warren On The Money — Presented by Wells Fargo — Sanders defends vote against USMCA | China sees weakest growth in 29 years | Warren praises IRS move on student loans MORE (I-Vt.) have slammed Bloomberg's entrance into the 2020 race, painting him as out of touch with the working class. 

"We do not believe that billionaires have the right to buy elections, and that is why we are going to overturn Citizens United, that is why multibillionaires like Mr. Bloomberg are not going to get very far in this election, that is why we are going to end voter suppression in America," Sanders said last month at a campaign event. 

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Warren pointed to fellow Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisSanders defends vote against USMCA: 'Not a single damn mention' of climate change The Hill's Morning Report — President Trump on trial Overnight Energy: Schumer votes against USMCA, citing climate impact | Republicans offer details on their environmental proposals | Microsoft aims to be carbon negative by 2030 MORE (D-Calif.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandSanders defends vote against USMCA: 'Not a single damn mention' of climate change The Hill's Morning Report — President Trump on trial Overnight Energy: Schumer votes against USMCA, citing climate impact | Republicans offer details on their environmental proposals | Microsoft aims to be carbon negative by 2030 MORE (D-N.Y.) dropping out of the Democratic primary, arguing that they were forced to end their campaigns while Bloomberg and fellow billionaire Tom SteyerTom Fahr SteyerPoll: Sanders holds 5-point lead over Buttigieg in New Hampshire Buttigieg takes dig at Sanders working 'for years' in Washington The Hill's Campaign Report: Sanders, Warren feud rattles Democrats MORE were able to buy their way into the race. 

While Bloomberg is ignoring the early contest states of Iowa and New Hampshire, he is laser-focused on the later Super Tuesday states. 

He launched a  multimillion-dollar ad buy across a number of states and media markets last month. 

The strategy, mixed with Bloomberg's high name recognition, appears to be having an impact in the polls. 

A Quinnipiac University poll released last month showed Bloomberg with the support of 3 percent of Democratic and left-leaning independent voters, higher than entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew YangDNC announces new criteria for New Hampshire debate Poll: Sanders holds 5-point lead over Buttigieg in New Hampshire Panel: Obama breaks Andrew Yang's heart MORE and former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro, as well as Sens. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDNC announces new criteria for New Hampshire debate The Hill's Campaign Report: Sanders, Warren feud rattles Democrats The Hill's Morning Report — President Trump on trial MORE (D-N.J.) and Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetSanders to headline Iowa event amid impeachment trial On The Money — Presented by Wells Fargo — Sanders defends vote against USMCA | China sees weakest growth in 29 years | Warren praises IRS move on student loans Klobuchar on missing campaigning for impeachment: 'I can do two things at once' MORE (D-Colo.).