Bloomberg on 2020 rivals blasting him for using his own money: 'They had a chance to go out and make a lot of money'

Bloomberg on 2020 rivals blasting him for using his own money: 'They had a chance to go out and make a lot of money'
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Former New York City Mayor Michael BloombergMichael BloombergEverytown on the NRA lawsuit: 'Come November, we're going to make sure they're out of power, too' Hillicon Valley: Trump raises idea of delaying election, faces swift bipartisan pushback | Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google release earnings reports | Senators ask Justice Department to investigate TikTok, Zoom Meme group joins with Lincoln Project in new campaign against Trump MORE blasted his 2020 Democratic rivals for criticizing him for self-funding his campaign, saying they had a chance to "make a lot of money."

"The point they're making is it's OK if they ask other people for all of their money, and it will help their careers," Bloomberg told CBS News in an interview that aired on Friday.

Bloomberg said he instead prefers to give away his earned money to causes he cares about, like public health, education and the environment. 

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"I think I could do a lot of good for the country if I could become president, and so using some of [that] money to fund the campaign is fine," he said. 

Bloomberg noted that he did not come from money and worked hard to be a successful businessman. 

"I give a hundred percent of the money away. What's wrong with all of that?" he added. "Ask them what they're doing. Why didn't they do that? They had a chance to go out and make a lot of money, and how much of their own money do they put into their own campaigns?" 

Progressive Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenBiden campaign says no VP pick yet after bike trail quip Biden edges closer to VP pick: Here's who's up and who's down Democratic convention lineup to include Ocasio-Cortez, Clinton, Warren: reports MORE (D-Mass.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Memo: Trump team pounces on Biden gaffes The Hill's Campaign Report: US officials say Russia, China are looking to sow discord in election Warren urges investment in child care workers amid pandemic MORE (I-Vt.) have slammed Bloomberg's entrance into the 2020 race, painting him as out of touch with the working class. 

"We do not believe that billionaires have the right to buy elections, and that is why we are going to overturn Citizens United, that is why multibillionaires like Mr. Bloomberg are not going to get very far in this election, that is why we are going to end voter suppression in America," Sanders said last month at a campaign event. 

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Warren pointed to fellow Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisBiden campaign says no VP pick yet after bike trail quip Hillary Clinton roasts NYT's Maureen Dowd over column Biden edges closer to VP pick: Here's who's up and who's down MORE (D-Calif.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandExpanding our health force can save lives and create jobs simultaneously Sanders offers bill to tax billionaires' wealth gains during pandemic Senate Democrats demand answers on migrant child trafficking during pandemic MORE (D-N.Y.) dropping out of the Democratic primary, arguing that they were forced to end their campaigns while Bloomberg and fellow billionaire Tom SteyerTom SteyerSteyer endorses reparations bill, commits to working with Jackson Lee Progressive group launches M pro-Biden ad buy targeting young voters The Hill's Campaign Report: Jacksonville mandates face coverings as GOP convention approaches MORE were able to buy their way into the race. 

While Bloomberg is ignoring the early contest states of Iowa and New Hampshire, he is laser-focused on the later Super Tuesday states. 

He launched a  multimillion-dollar ad buy across a number of states and media markets last month. 

The strategy, mixed with Bloomberg's high name recognition, appears to be having an impact in the polls. 

A Quinnipiac University poll released last month showed Bloomberg with the support of 3 percent of Democratic and left-leaning independent voters, higher than entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew YangProgressive candidate Bush talks about her upset primary win over Rep. Clay Is this the end of the 'college experience'? Biden campaign to take over 'Supernatural' star's Instagram for interview MORE and former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro, as well as Sens. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerSenate Democrats demand answers on migrant child trafficking during pandemic Senate Democrats push to include free phone calls for incarcerated people in next relief package Ex-USAID employee apologizes, denies sending explosive tweets MORE (D-N.J.) and Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetExpanding our health force can save lives and create jobs simultaneously How Congress is preventing a Medicare bankruptcy during COVID-19 Tom Cotton rips NY Times for Chinese scientist op-ed criticizing US coronavirus response MORE (D-Colo.).