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Former White House physician Ronny Jackson to run for Congress

Former White House physician Ronny Jackson to run for Congress
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Former White House physician and retired Navy Rear Admiral Ronny Jackson will run for a seat in the House of Representatives in Texas, formally filing papers just hours before a state deadline.
 
Jackson will run as a Republican for the seat held by retiring Rep. Mac ThornberryWilliam (Mac) McClellan ThornberryUnnamed law enforcement banned under the new NDAA Lobbying world Senate poised to override Trump's defense bill veto MORE (R), the top Republican on the House Armed Services Committee. The rural Texas Panhandle district is heavily Republican; President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden administration still seizing land near border despite plans to stop building wall: report Illinois House passes bill that would mandate Asian-American history lessons in schools Overnight Defense: Administration says 'low to moderate confidence' Russia behind Afghanistan troop bounties | 'Low to medium risk' of Russia invading Ukraine in next few weeks | Intelligence leaders face sharp questions during House worldwide threats he MORE scored almost 80 percent of the vote there in 2016.
 
Jackson, who has never run for public office before, will face almost a dozen other Republicans who have already entered the race.
 
The Texas Tribune first reported Jackson’s decision to formally file. He had been rumored to be interested in the seat for about a month.
 
Jackson retired from the Navy just days ago after 24 years. He spent more than a decade as a top physician to Presidents George W. Bush, Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaBiden can make history on nuclear arms reductions Biden has nearly 90-point approval gap between Democrats, Republicans: poll The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - CDC in limbo on J&J vax verdict; Rep. Brady retiring MORE and Donald Trump — including five years as the top White House physician — before Trump nominated him to become the secretary of Veterans Affairs.
 
Jackson’s nomination stalled over concerns about his handling of the White House office.
 
Trump later appointed him as the president’s chief medical adviser, a newly created position.
 
The Navy’s Inspector General is still investigating allegations that he improperly handled prescription drugs during his White House years. Former Navy Secretary Richard Spencer approved of Jackson’s request to retire.