SPONSORED:

Former White House physician Ronny Jackson to run for Congress

Former White House physician Ronny Jackson to run for Congress
© Getty Images
Former White House physician and retired Navy Rear Admiral Ronny Jackson will run for a seat in the House of Representatives in Texas, formally filing papers just hours before a state deadline.
 
Jackson will run as a Republican for the seat held by retiring Rep. Mac ThornberryWilliam (Mac) McClellan ThornberryOvernight Defense: Formal negotiations inch forward on defense bill with Confederate base name language | Senators look to block B UAE arms sales | Trump administration imposes Iran sanctions over human rights abuses Defense bill moves to formal negotiations with Confederate name fight looming Overnight Defense: Trump orders troop drawdown in Afghanistan and Iraq | Key Republicans call Trump plan a 'mistake' MORE (R), the top Republican on the House Armed Services Committee. The rural Texas Panhandle district is heavily Republican; President TrumpDonald John TrumpVenezuela judge orders prison time for 6 American oil executives Trump says he'll leave White House if Biden declared winner of Electoral College The Memo: Biden faces tough road on pledge to heal nation MORE scored almost 80 percent of the vote there in 2016.
 
Jackson, who has never run for public office before, will face almost a dozen other Republicans who have already entered the race.
 
The Texas Tribune first reported Jackson’s decision to formally file. He had been rumored to be interested in the seat for about a month.
 
Jackson retired from the Navy just days ago after 24 years. He spent more than a decade as a top physician to Presidents George W. Bush, Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaObama: Republican Party members believe 'white males are victims' Texas warehouse where migrants housed in 'cages' closed for humane renovation North Carolina — still purple but up for grabs MORE and Donald Trump — including five years as the top White House physician — before Trump nominated him to become the secretary of Veterans Affairs.
 
Jackson’s nomination stalled over concerns about his handling of the White House office.
 
Trump later appointed him as the president’s chief medical adviser, a newly created position.
 
The Navy’s Inspector General is still investigating allegations that he improperly handled prescription drugs during his White House years. Former Navy Secretary Richard Spencer approved of Jackson’s request to retire.