Biden campaign denies one-term report

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenPoll: Bloomberg stalls after Vegas debate Bloomberg campaign: Vandalism at Tennessee office 'echoes language from the Sanders campaign and its supporters' Democratic strategist says Biden 'has to' get second place in Nevada MORE's campaign denied a report on Wednesday that Biden has signaled he would only serve one term in the White House if elected in 2020. 

"Lots of chatter out there on this so just want to be crystal clear: this is not a conversation our campaign is having and not something VP Biden is thinking about," Biden's deputy campaign manager and communications director, Kate Bedingfield, said in a tweet. 

 

 

Biden later denied the reports on Wednesday.

"No. I never have. I don't have plans on one term. I'm not even there yet," Biden said. 

 

 

Politico reported on Wednesday that four people who speak regularly with the former vice president said it was unlikely that he would run for reelection in 2024 if he defeats President TrumpDonald John TrumpComey responds to Trump with Mariah Carey gif: 'Why are you so obsessed with me?' Congress to get election security briefing next month amid Intel drama New York man accused of making death threats against Schumer, Schiff MORE in 2020, citing his age. 

“If Biden is elected,” an adviser to the campaign told the outlet, “he’s going to be 82 years old in four years and he won’t be running for reelection.”

“He’s going into this thinking, ‘I want to find a running mate I can turn things over to after four years, but if that’s not possible or doesn’t happen then I’ll run for reelection.’ But he’s not going to publicly make a one-term pledge,” another adviser reportedly said.

Biden told The Associated Press in October that he was not necessarily committed to running for a second term. 
 
“I feel good and all I can say is, watch me, you’ll see,” he said. “It doesn’t mean I would run a second term. I’m not going to make that judgment at this moment.”

Biden has led the crowded Democratic primary since he jumped into the race last April. 

The former vice president widened his lead, according to a Quinnipiac University survey released on Tuesday, increasing his support from 24 percent to 29 percent.