Jill Biden: Trump is 'afraid' to go against my husband

Jill Biden, the wife of 2020 contender and former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenWarren: Dershowitz presentation 'nonsensical,' 'could not follow it' Bolton told Barr he was concerned Trump did favors for autocrats: report Dershowitz: Bolton allegations would not constitute impeachable offense MORE, said President TrumpDonald John TrumpWarren: Dershowitz presentation 'nonsensical,' 'could not follow it' Bolton told Barr he was concerned Trump did favors for autocrats: report Dershowitz: Bolton allegations would not constitute impeachable offense MORE’s attacks on her family are evidence that the president is “afraid” to run against her husband.

"Well, you know, when Joe and I decided to run for president, when we made that decision, we knew it was going to be tough," Jill Biden said Saturday on MSNBC.

"But we never could have imagined that it would turn into, that Donald Trump would be asking a foreign government to get involved in our elections, and I think, you know, Donald Trump has shown us who he is, and this has been a real distraction," she continued. "And I think it just proves that he's afraid to run against my husband, Joe Biden."

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Trump has made Hunter Biden, the Bidens' son, a focal point of his impeachment defense. Trump asked Ukraine to investigate the Bidens over unfounded corruption allegations linked to Hunter Biden's work for a natural gas company that was under investigation.

Jill Biden maintained that her son did nothing wrong and that her husband will continue to defend him.

"I know my son's character," she said. "Hunter did nothing wrong, and that's the bottom line."

"I think any parent who is watching this show knows that if anyone attacked their son or daughter, I mean, you don't just sit down and take it. You fight for your kid," she added, referring to an incident in Iowa in which her husband engaged in an argumentative back-and-forth over their son's work in Ukraine. 

Polls show Joe Biden leading Trump in several battleground states, with observers speculating that the former vice president could take a bite out of Trump’s support among white working-class voters.