SPONSORED:

Klobuchar on impeachment: 'This is a global Watergate'

Klobuchar on impeachment: 'This is a global Watergate'

Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharDemocrats scramble to unify before election bill brawl Hillicon Valley: Big Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC | Lawmakers urge Biden to be tough on cyber during summit with Putin | TSA working on additional security regulations following Colonial Pipeline hack Big Tech critic Lina Khan named chair of the FTC MORE (D-Minn.) labeled President TrumpDonald TrumpHead of firms that pushed 'Italygate' theory falsely claimed VA mansion was her home: report Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting VA moving to cover gender affirmation surgery through department health care MORE’s dealings with Ukraine as a “global Watergate” and called on him to allow administration officials to testify in the Senate’s impeachment trial.

“This is a global Watergate. In the case of Watergate, a paranoid president facing election looked for dirt on a political opponent. He did it by getting people to break in. This president did it by calling a political leader to look for dirt on a political opponent,” Klobuchar said at the 2020 Democratic primary debate Thursday in Los Angeles.

ADVERTISEMENT

The House on Wednesday voted to pass two articles of impeachment — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — over Trump’s dealings with Ukraine. House Democrats allege that the president pressured Kyiv to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe Biden 64 percent of Iowans say 'time for someone else' to hold Grassley's Senate seat: poll Philadelphia shooting leaves 2 dead, injures toddler Ron Johnson booed at Juneteenth celebration in Wisconsin MORE, a chief political rival, and obstructed justice by ordering staffers to defy congressional subpoenas. 

The vote sets up a trial in the Senate, where Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP increasingly balks at calling Jan. 6 an insurrection Black lawmakers warn against complacency after Juneteenth victory Graham quips key to working with Trump: We both 'like him' MORE (R-Ky.) and Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) are struggling to hammer out a deal as to the formal of the proceedings.

The central divide between the two parties revolves around if the Senate should pressure the White House to send officials to testify, with the GOP saying they seek a quick trial without witnesses and Democrats saying testimony is necessary for a fair trial. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Klobuchar pushed the White House to agree to send acting White House Chief of Staff Mick MulvaneyMick MulvaneyHeadhunters having hard time finding jobs for former Trump officials: report Trump holdovers are denying Social Security benefits to the hardest working Americans Mulvaney calls Trump's comments on Capitol riot 'manifestly false' MORE and former National Security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonUS drops lawsuit, closes probe over Bolton book John Bolton: Biden-Putin meeting 'premature' Republicans request documents on Kerry's security clearance process MORE to the Senate, both of whom are believed to have intimate knowledge of the administration’s dealings with Ukraine, including its decision to temporarily withhold nearly $400 million in military aid to the country. 

“And I would make this case. As we face this trial in the Senate, if the president claims that he is so innocent, then why doesn’t he have all the president’s men testify?” Klobuchar asked.

“If president Trump thinks that he should not be impeached, he should be not scared to put forward his own witnesses.”