Trump primary challengers left off Wisconsin ballot

Trump primary challengers left off Wisconsin ballot
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President TrumpDonald John TrumpChasten Buttigieg: 'I've been dealing with the likes of Rush Limbaugh my entire life' Lawmakers paint different pictures of Trump's 'opportunity zone' program We must not turn our heads from the effects of traumatic brain injuries MORE’s primary challengers in the 2020 race have been left off the Wisconsin ballot after the state’s Republican Party submitted only his name.

A committee made up of Republicans and Democrats met with state election officials to determine who will appear on the April 7 primary ballot, The Associated Press reported.

Republican committee members submitted only the president’s name, and he was supported unanimously, leaving out former Massachusetts Gov. William WeldWilliam (Bill) WeldGOP governor endorses Weld in Vermont primary Trump wins New Hampshire Republican primary The Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden leaving New Hampshire early as voting underway MORE and former Rep. Joe WalshJoe WalshLimbaugh on Buttigieg: 'America's still not ready to elect a gay guy kissing his husband on the debate stage' Bill Weld secures one Iowa delegate in longshot primary challenge to Trump Pence to make swing through New Hampshire on eve of primary MORE (Ill.), his GOP challengers. 

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Weld and Walsh could still appear on the primary ballot if they obtain 8,000 signatures by Jan. 28, according to the news wire. 

Andrew Hitt, the chairman of the Wisconsin Republican Party, said they decided not to submit the other GOP candidates’ names because of their lack of activity in the state, their lack of success in making it on other state ballots and their lack of communication, as they didn’t contact the state’s party until Monday. The Trump campaign, on the other hand, has been working with the party, Hitt said, according to the AP.

Weld took to Twitter to express his displeasure with the Wisconsin GOP’s decision, calling it “shameful” and “not how a democracy works.”

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Walsh campaign spokesperson Charles Siler told The Hill that the campaign is "incredibly angry" over the decision, saying it disenfranchises Republican voters.

"I would just say this kind of disenfranchisement is unprecedented as so many things are in the Trump presidency," he said.

The Democrats on the committee put 14 candidates, who were all unanimously approved, on the ballot. These candidates included former Vice President Joe BidenJoe Biden'Where's your spoon?' What we didn't learn in the latest debate Sanders nabs endorsement from Congressional Hispanic Caucus member Poll: Sanders holds 7-point lead in crucial California primary MORE, former New York City Mayor Michael BloombergMichael Rubens BloombergNevada Democratic debate draws record-breaking 19.7 million viewers 'Where's your spoon?' What we didn't learn in the latest debate Ocasio-Cortez defends Warren against 'misogynist trope' MORE, Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersNevada Democratic debate draws record-breaking 19.7 million viewers 'Where's your spoon?' What we didn't learn in the latest debate Ocasio-Cortez defends Warren against 'misogynist trope' MORE (I-Vt.), Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharWarren declines to disavow super PAC that supports her San Diego Union-Tribune endorses Buttigieg 'Where's your spoon?' What we didn't learn in the latest debate MORE (D-Minn.) and Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenWarren declines to disavow super PAC that supports her San Diego Union-Tribune endorses Buttigieg 'Where's your spoon?' What we didn't learn in the latest debate MORE (D-Mass.).

Weld and Walsh have struggled to make the initial ballots in several states, including Minnesota and Georgia, and other states such as Hawaii and South Carolina canceled their GOP primaries.