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Kerry defends Biden on Iraq War vote: Bush administration 'broke their word'

Kerry defends Biden on Iraq War vote: Bush administration 'broke their word'
© Francis Rivera

Former Secretary of State John KerryJohn KerryLeaked UN climate report underscores growing risk, need for fast action America needs a whole-of-government approach to studying unidentified aerial phenomena Beware language and the art of manipulation MORE defended former Vice President Joe BidenJoe Biden Pence said he's 'proud' Congress certified Biden's win on Jan. 6 Americans put the most trust in their doctor for COVID-19 information: poll US to give Afghanistan 3M doses of J&J vaccine MORE's voting record on the Iraq War, saying that the Bush administration "'broke their word" with regard to proceedings in Iraq. 

“The fact is that we were promised by a president, by an administration, that they were going to do it as a last resort after exhausting diplomacy, that if they have to go to war it would be with a coalition that they built broadly, and that they would do it only in conjunction with our allies," Kerry said Friday, according to NBC News.

“It was a mistake to have trusted them, I guess, and we paid a high price for it,” Kerry continued. “But that was not voting for the war.”

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As the Iowa caucuses creep closer, Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden announces bipartisan infrastructure deal | DOJ backs Trump-era approval of Line 3 permit | Biden hits China on solar panels Biden says he won't sign bipartisan bill without reconciliation bill Business groups applaud bipartisan infrastructure deal MORE (I-Vt.), who opposed and voted against the Iraq War, has ratcheted up his attacks on Biden's Iraq War voting record.

Sanders told CNN earlier this month that, “Joe Biden voted and helped lead the effort for the war in Iraq, the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in the modern history of this country."

Kerry, who was a surrogate on Biden's Iowa “We Know Joe” campaign tour this week, pushed back against Sander's claim, saying that "there was a difference in people who felt they needed to give a president the leverage to be able to get Saddam Hussein back to the table, without having to go to war."

The former Massachusetts senator argued that Biden is a part of this distinction, saying it "didn't mean you were in favor when the administration made the decision of actually going to war.”

The latest Des Moines Register/CNN poll has Biden fourth in Iowa behind former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegButtigieg says federal government supports rights of companies to implement vaccine passport High-speed rail getting last minute push in Congress Buttigieg: Bipartisan deal on infrastructure 'strongly preferred' MORE, Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Biden announces bipartisan infrastructure deal | DOJ backs Trump-era approval of Line 3 permit | Biden hits China on solar panels Progressives fire warning shot on bipartisan infrastructure deal Bipartisan agriculture climate bill clears Senate MORE (D-Mass.) and Sanders, though just five points separate Biden and Sanders.