Sanders: Releasing list of Supreme Court picks 'not a bad idea'

Sanders: Releasing list of Supreme Court picks 'not a bad idea'
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Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden alleges Sanders campaign 'doctored video' to attack him on Social Security record Sanders campaign responds to Biden doctored video claims: Biden should 'stop trying to doctor' public record The Memo: Sanders-Warren battle could reshape Democratic primary MORE (I-Vt.) said in a new interview that he would consider releasing a list of potential Supreme Court nominees, but it would be premature to do so before winning the Democratic presidential primary. 

“It’s not a bad idea,” Sanders told The New York Times.

“It’s a reasonable idea. My wife agrees with you,” he added. “Yeah. I’ll take that into consideration.”

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Sanders added that it’s too soon to reveal such a list now, telling the newspaper's editors that he’s “got to kind of win the nomination first.”

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump's newest Russia adviser, Andrew Peek, leaves post: report Hawley expects McConnell's final impeachment resolution to give White House defense ability to motion to dismiss Trump rips New York City sea wall: 'Costly, foolish' and 'environmentally unfriendly idea' MORE released a list of potential Supreme Court nominees in 2016 during his campaign. The 11 potential nominees did not include the two Supreme Court justices he nominated in his first term in office, Neil GorsuchNeil GorsuchJanuary reminds us why courts matter — and the dangers of 'Trump judges' Planned Parenthood launches M campaign to back Democrats in 2020 Appeals court appears wary of letting Trump reinstate death sentences MORE and Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughDemocratic group plans mobile billboard targeting Collins on impeachment January reminds us why courts matter — and the dangers of 'Trump judges' Planned Parenthood launches M campaign to back Democrats in 2020 MORE

The executive director of Demand Justice, a progressive nonprofit group, on Monday called Sanders’s comments “a step in the right direction.”

“Releasing a Supreme Court shortlist would help voters understand how a candidate would deal with one of the most important issues facing the country and mobilize voters around a progressive vision for the courts,” Brian Fallon said in a statement.

“As the field narrows, all presidential candidates should prioritize the courts if they want to show voters they have a real plan to protect any of their other ideas from a hijacked judiciary. The moderators at this week’s Democratic primary debate should ask other candidates whether they will release a list of Supreme Court nominees.”

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Sanders will face five of his opponents — Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenThe Memo: Sanders-Warren battle could reshape Democratic primary Environmental activists interrupt Buttigieg in New Hampshire Pence to visit Iowa days before caucuses MORE (D-Mass.), former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden alleges Sanders campaign 'doctored video' to attack him on Social Security record Sanders campaign responds to Biden doctored video claims: Biden should 'stop trying to doctor' public record Capt. "Sully" Sullenberger pens op-ed in defense of Biden: 'I stuttered once, too. I dare you to mock me' MORE, former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegThe Memo: Sanders-Warren battle could reshape Democratic primary Environmental activists interrupt Buttigieg in New Hampshire Pence to visit Iowa days before caucuses MORE, Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharSanders to headline Iowa event amid impeachment trial On The Money — Presented by Wells Fargo — Sanders defends vote against USMCA | China sees weakest growth in 29 years | Warren praises IRS move on student loans Poll: Sanders holds 5-point lead over Buttigieg in New Hampshire MORE (D-Minn.) and Tom SteyerTom Fahr SteyerPoll: Sanders holds 5-point lead over Buttigieg in New Hampshire Buttigieg takes dig at Sanders working 'for years' in Washington The Hill's Campaign Report: Sanders, Warren feud rattles Democrats MORE —  in a debate in Iowa on Tuesday. It is the last debate ahead of the state’s first-in-the nation Feb. 3 caucuses.

Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerSunday shows preview: Lawmakers gear up for Senate impeachment trial DNC announces new criteria for New Hampshire debate The Hill's Campaign Report: Sanders, Warren feud rattles Democrats MORE (D-N.J.), who did not qualify for the debate, dropped out of the primary on Monday, leaving 12 Democrats still competing for the nomination. 

The Times will endorse a candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination on Jan. 19. The newspaper announced earlier this month it will make all candidate interviews public this year. 

--Updated at 12:27 p.m.