Poll: Biden leads Democratic field nationally after Sanders takes top spot in Iowa poll

Poll: Biden leads Democratic field nationally after Sanders takes top spot in Iowa poll
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Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Hill's Campaign Report: Sanders exits, clearing Biden's path to nomination Former Clinton staffers invited to celebrate Sanders dropping out: report Sanders exit leaves deep disappointment on left MORE continues to lead the field of Democratic presidential contenders, but there are signs that Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTrump says Obama knows 'something that you don't know' about Biden The Hill's Campaign Report: Sanders exits, clearing Biden's path to nomination Former Clinton staffers invited to celebrate Sanders dropping out: report MORE (I-Vt.) is gaining ground nationally, according to a survey from Quinnipiac University Poll released on Monday.

The poll shows Biden with the support of 25 percent of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independents from across the nation who were surveyed. Sanders takes the No. 2 spot, with the support of 19 percent.

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While Biden still holds the lead, his support dropped by 5 points since Quinnipiac’s last national poll was released in December. Sanders, meanwhile, gained 3 points since the last survey. 

Rounding out the top four candidates in the latest Quinnipiac poll were Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOn The Money: Mnuchin, Schumer in talks to strike short-term relief deal | Small businesses struggling for loans | Treasury IG sends Dems report on handling of Trump tax returns Trump says Obama knows 'something that you don't know' about Biden Senators push for changes to small business aid MORE (D-Mass.) and former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegFormer Clinton staffers invited to celebrate Sanders dropping out: report Sanders exit leaves deep disappointment on left Michael Bennet endorses Biden for president MORE, who took 16 percent and 8 percent, respectively. Their support saw little change over the past month; each candidate lost 1 point in the most recent poll.

The survey also shows former New York City Mayor Michael BloombergMichael BloombergFormer Clinton staffers invited to celebrate Sanders dropping out: report Sanders drops out of presidential race New York City auctioned off extra ventilators due to cost of maintenance: report MORE holding his place near the middle of the presidential pack. He registered 6 percent support in the poll, outperforming candidates like Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharFormer Clinton staffers invited to celebrate Sanders dropping out: report Sanders exit leaves deep disappointment on left Michael Bennet endorses Biden for president MORE (D-Minn.) and former tech executive Andrew YangAndrew YangFormer Clinton staffers invited to celebrate Sanders dropping out: report Jack Dorsey committing billion to coronavirus relief efforts Campaigns face attack ad dilemma amid coronavirus crisis MORE, who have been running for the Democratic nomination for much longer.

Still, there’s evidence that the Democratic field remains fluid. Only 35 percent of Democratic and Democratic-leaning respondents said they had made up their mind on who they will support in the primary contest. Another 63 percent said they could still change their minds.

Warren and Sanders are the most frequently named second-choice candidates. Nineteen percent of respondents said they would vote for Warren if they could not for their first choice, while 18 percent said Sanders was their No. 2 pick. Biden was the second choice of about 13 percent of those surveyed.

The Quinnipiac national poll came days after a Des Moines Register-CNN survey of likely Democratic caucusgoers in Iowa showed Sanders leading the pack in the Hawkeye State. A Monmouth University Poll survey of Iowa Democrats released on Monday showed Biden leading in the state, followed by Sanders, Buttigieg and Warren.

How the Iowa caucuses shake out — as well as the other early nominating contests in New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina — could reshape the Democratic primary field at the national level, especially if voters start lining up behind those candidates who see success in the early states.

The Quinnipiac poll surveyed 651 Democratic and Democratic-leaning independent voters from Jan. 8-12. It has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.8 percentage points.